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25/07/16 New Lanark Search Room # , , , ,

Search Room Spotlight: Glass bottle of IRN BRU

Search Room Spotlight: Glass bottle of IRN BRU

This item was found on site during the restoration of New Lanark that began in the late 1970s. In comparing the design of bottles over the years it appears as though the date of the bottle is sometime during the late 1940s. The shape of the bottle was designed in the form of “BA BRU” who was featured in the long running cartoon strip that advertised the product, which began in 1930 until the early 1970s. Ba-Bru was inspired by the character of “Sabu” in Rudyard Kipling’s book “Sab: The Elephant Boy”.

Ba-bru-design 1948ba-bru

During the 1830s, Robert Barr started a family business of cork cutting in Falkirk. In 1857, Robert’s son, Robert decided to start selling aerated waters (soft drinks) out of Glasgow. During the nineteenth century, Scotland had problems with poor sanitation due to the industrial revolution. As a result, soft drinks became popular as they were guaranteed to be a safe, quality drink for people.

Iron Brew was officially launched in 1901 and featured Adam Brown on the design label, who was a famous highland athlete from Shotts. The production of Iron Brew stopped during the second war as it was not a designated “standard drink” and as a result of shortages of raw materials, production temporarily shut down. With their re-launch in 1947, the brand also changed their name due to emerging food labeling regulations enforced by the Government and since the beverage was neither brewed nor made of Iron, they changed their name to IRN BRU.

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Today, Scotland remains one of the only countries where IRN BRU is more popular than Coca Cola.

RESOURCES

http://www.agbarr.co.uk/about-us/our-history/bottle-gallery/

http://www.agbarr.co.uk/about-us/our-history/

 

Holly – New Lanark Archive Intern

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21/07/16 New Lanark World Heritage Site # , , , , , , ,

Great days out for Groups in Scotland!

Great days out for Groups in Scotland!

New Lanark is a perfect day out for a group outing as there is so much to see and do. The heart of New Lanark is a living and working village, which is situated in an outstanding location by the majestic Falls of Clyde. There are activities for all ages to enjoy including the many attractions of the award winning Visitor Centre, regular events and exhibitions and beautiful woodland walks in the Falls of Clyde wildlife reserve. Book your group outing now to see the wonders of New Lanark World Heritage Site. Contact our friendly team on [email protected] or 01555 661345 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm)

DSC_4252 NEW LANARK ROOF GARDEN (wide)

 

Here are some other sites groups may enjoy in Scotland…

The Edinburgh Dungeon (Just over 1 hour/ 33.9 miles from New Lanark)

Edinburgh Dungeon

Photo credit: hubpages.com

If you and your friends like a good scare, check out the Edinburgh Dungeon! Group packages are available so why not head over to have a frighteningly good experience.

 

Five Sisters Zoo (32 mins/ 18.1 miles from New Lanark)

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Photo credit: secretscotland.wordpress.com

Another exciting place to visit, that is not far from us here in New Lanark, is the Five Sisters Zoo. See a range of different kinds of animals in all shapes and sizes including Lions and Bears. Group tours are available if you and some friends fancy a fun day out!

 

National Mining Museum (1 hour/ 40.6 miles from New Lanark)

Photo credit:

Photo credit: www.stickssn.org

Enjoy a day out with your group at the National Mining Museum in Edinburgh. Take a look at the engineering brilliance behind all the machinery and retrace the footsteps and struggles of the thousands of miners and their families before them.

 

Stirling Castle (Just over an hour/ 41 miles from New Lanark)

Stirling Castle is a great day out for groups, rich in history and has beautiful sites to look at. Enjoy the sites in the castle and the surrounding views that come with it!

 

Royal Yacht Britannia (1 hour 17 mins/ 38.6 miles from New Lanark)

The Royal Yacht Britannia experience is one like no other! Discover what life was like on board Her Majesty’s floating Royal residence. If you travel within a group then visit the Royal Yacht Britannia and enjoy a guided tour of each deck.

 

Dynamic Earth (Just over an hour/ 34.2 miles from New Lanark)

Photo credit:

Photo credit: www.dynamicearth.co.uk

Dynamic Earth allows you to take a journey through time to witness the story of planet Earth. Through a series of interactive exhibits you will feel the heat of a bubbling volcano, face the chill of polar ice, fly across the globe before crash landing in a tropical rainforest. Dynamic Earth is great for groups as there is so much to do!

If you’d like to find out more about enjoying a group visit to New Lanark please visit our website.

Ronan Moore – New Lanark Marketing Intern

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20/07/16 Double Row Restoration Project , Events at New Lanark # , ,

The 1820’s Back In Time Day!

The 1820’s Back In Time Day!

The 1820’s Back In Time Day

On Sunday the 17th of July we hosted a back in time day here at New Lanark World Heritage Site. We managed to capture what life would have been like for a millworker in the 1820s and gave the public an opportunity to ‘step back in time’ to experience it for themselves. This consisted of dancing and music from that period of time, food and craft demonstrations, storytelling and living history. Games, toys and crafts were also available for children on the site! There was also a Clyde 1 Photo Booth for the children to dress up and get their photo taken with a historic background. Stalls were set up along the lade, demonstrating different kinds of activities that millworkers may partake in such as: Spinning, Weaving, Wood Turning and more! There was also a stall which offered free food to the visitors. The food was the type millworkers would have eaten in the 1820’s, for example, Oatcakes, Ham Broth, Porridge Swats and Apple Bake. With Potato Pie, Apple Dumpling and Herring in Oatmeal on display.

This event is part of a Townscape Heritage / Conservation Area Regeneration Scheme. Phase 1 of this large-scale regeneration project is the restoration of Double Row, a Category A listed former millworkers’ tenement block, built in the 1790s. A range of heritage-based community activities will be delivered in parallel to the construction works.

The day started off with a welcome from Robert Owen himself giving a shortened version of his original speech, known as, Address to the inhabitants of New Lanark. Robert Owen and Miss Winning were accompanied by two of their millworkers who shared their experience with the visitors!

Robert Owen

Robert Owen and Miss Winning!

wearing their badges with pride

Once Robert Own had given his speech to the people of New lanark, it was time for the fun activities to start. There were dancing classes, storytelling and games throughout the day, approximately every 30 minutes. These activities proved to be a success as they were extremely popular!

Dancing Classes 

Dancers from The Glasgow and Edinburgh Assembly came down to teach dance routines from the 1820s in the Musicians’ Room of the Institute for the Formation of Character.

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Storytelling

Children gathered round the storyteller who told early 19th century myths and fairy tales. These stories were the stories that children used to tell each other in the past!

 

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Crafts and Games

Inside we had a range of different games and activities for children to take part in. Activities such as writing with a quill and wool weaving . Hopscotch was also available along with other games child used to play in the 1820s.

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Games in the garden

Several children’s games were held in the garden such as: Tug Of War, Sack races and Potato and Spoon race. The games were organised and manned by our local Lanark Rugby Team.

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Falconry Flying Display

Once all the activities were over, it was time to watch the birds of prey display. The Falconry Flying Display took place in Robert Owen’s garden. This gave everyone a chance to see how certain birds of prey hunt. There was a mix of birds of prey on offer including an African Spotted Eagle Owl and a Peregrine Falcon. Each bird demonstrated its hunting skills and put on a very impressive display for the viewers!

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Ponies

Visitors were able to meet these very cute ponies and learn about the role of horses in the village in the early 19th century!

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Traditional Food Samples

Ham Broth, Oatcakes, Porridge Swats, Apple Bake and Nettle Tea were the 1820’s traditional fair on offer!

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The Back In Time Day turned out to be a great success, enjoyed by all ages. Due to the variety of activities on offer, children were able to enjoy the games and crafts as well as the adults being able to enjoy the woodwork and the spinning wheels! The Back In Time Day will be running over the next three years as parts of the Double Row Restoration project, each year highlighting a different period of time in New Lanark’s history. So look out for our next choice of decade!

Ronan Moore – Marketing Intern

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18/07/16 New Lanark Search Room # , , , , ,

Search Room Spotlight: New Lanark Shipping Label

Search Room Spotlight: New Lanark Shipping Label

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This is a photographic reproduction of an original drawing of New Lanark by resident artist, John Winning. By 1813, the value of the mills had risen to £114, 000 (from £60,000 in 1799) and enough cotton was produced in a week to go around the world 2.5 times. As a result, Owen had commissioned Winning in 1818 to produce a series of illustrations of New Lanark to be used as export labels as a way to promote their product. Each 10lb. bundle of yarn from New Lanark had a label with a print of the mills and became recognized by foreign buyers as “Picture Yarn”.

The bulk of New Lanark’s home sales were done through the Glasgow yarn market while still maintaining sales throughout Britain to places as far apart as Dublin and Norwich. New Lanark cotton was also sent all over the world to places such as Holland, the Baltic, and Russia though the majority of sales were made in Amsterdam, Elberfeld, and St. Petersburg.

We currently have an export label in our collection that is on display in the Robert Owen House. This label was translated and attached to packages of yarn that were sent to Russia.

russianlabel

Today, the Mills still continue to produce yarn using traditional 19th century spinning mules powered by our own hydro-electricity production. Now we produce woolen yarn instead of cotton in Double Knitting, Chunky, Aran and Organic varieties. All proceeds from our wool production are returned to New Lanark Trust to be reinvested in the care of our historic village. You can purchase New Lanark Wool & Textiles online at www.newlanarkshop.co.uk or at New Lanark in our Mill Shop.

RESOURCES:

Historic New Lanark
The Story of New Lanark
Robert Owen: Owen of New Lanark & New Harmony – Ian Donnachie

Holly – New Lanark Archive Intern

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12/07/16 New Lanark Health & Fitness Club # , , ,

New Lanark Health and Fitness

New Lanark Health and Fitness

Amongst all the history and beauty we have to offer here in New Lanark, there is a modern, private members, health and fitness club which may take you by surprise. The health and fitness club has up to date technology which will create a pleasant experience for all . From the O-Zone swimming pool to the top of the range equipment in the gym, New Lanark Health and Fitness club has it all.

New Lanark Health and Fitness centre is managed by Julianne Stewart who has been here since March 2007. The Health and Fitness centre did not open until the start of May, 2007 and has been in the hands of Julianne ever since. Julianne is joined by a team of 15 employees in the Health and Fitness centre ranging from fitness instructors to beauty therapists.

Gym

Fancy passing the Eiffel Tower on your bike whilst  listening to the bustling noise of the French streets and catching a whiff of freshly made crepes? Okay, maybe you won’t be able to smell the crepes but New Lanark’s gym has advanced technology on the treadmills and exercise bikes which allow you to choose a destination around the world and watch the route you would take if you were actually there! You are able to programme the screen attached to the bike/running machine to show you the view of what running/cycling the streets of famous destinations around the world would look like. You can also hear the surrounding sounds if you have earphones with you. If this isn’t for you that doesn’t mean you’ll just have to stare at the wall in front of you, you can check out what’s on the telly! The machines offer a variety of programmes to watch and also let you access the internet to browse Facebook or shop online! The gym also has traditional weightlifting equipment.

 

Cycle by the Eiffel Tour!

Cycle by the Eiffel Tour!

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My Zone is another aspect New Lanark gym have to offer. My Zone is controlled by a belt which measures your heart rate and provides scores of how well you are doing in meeting your goals. My Zone also creates a page for each person and you can become friends in this online community with people from overseas, for example, gym goers in San Diego! Barack Obama also uses My Zone but he might be rather hard to become friends with… New Lanark are unique in having this system as it is not available in every gym. My Zone grades how hard you are working by colours: grey being lightly working out, red being an extremely hard workout.

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Swimming Pool

Why not take a dip into the O-Zone swimming pool in New Lanark? and enjoy the relaxing ambiance created by the colourful, calming lights. O-Zone means there is a smaller percentage of chlorine in the pool. The swimming pool can be sectioned off for those who want to go for a swim and to those who just want to relax in the pool. The swimming pool is great for all ages, adults who prefer to have a quiet leisurely swim can take advantage of the limited children hours. However, if you do have children you can take them for a dip yourself, or even, attend one of the Little Nessies classes taught by an external swimming coach! The Swimming pool also has a sauna and steam room beside it. Hotel guests can enjoy complimentary use of the facilities. All facilities are wheelchair accessible.

Hotel swimming pool

Exercise Classes

New Lanark also offer a range of different exercise classes such as: Spin, Pilates, Tabata, PiYo Live and many more! PiYo live is usually an exercise video, however, Julianne is now a qualified Piyo instructor and can now teach in live! The exercise timetable can be found at reception.

Top of the range exercise

Top of the range exercise

To find out more about New Lanark health and fitness visit the Health and Fitness page on our New Lanark website!

Ronan Moore – New Lanark Marketing Intern

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06/07/16 Behind the scenes at New Lanark , New Lanark Search Room , New Lanark World Heritage Site # , , , , , ,

Search Room Spotlight: Keys from New Lanark

Search Room Spotlight: Keys from New Lanark

There are numerous keys in our collection that were found during the restoration of New Lanark that began in the late 1970s. The photo above depicts a selection of keys that originally belonged to former residents of the village.

At its peak in 1818, there were 2,500 employees at New Lanark. The majority of people who worked in the Mills, lived in the early tenement blocks built by New Lanark’s founder, David Dale, to accommodate his workers. These buildings, including Braxfield Row, Long Row, Double Row, Wee Row, Nursery Row, Caithness Row, Mantila Row & New Buildings provided housing for around 200 families. Each family had one room with a window – excellent conditions for the period!. A typical tenement room had two “set in” beds on the wall opposite the fireplace. These consisted of a sturdy wooden framework built into the wall and a mattress which was a bag made of ticking and stuffed with chaff or straw. To accommodate larger families, a “hurlie bed” was used which was a simple cot-like bed on wheels that was stored under the “set in” bed. Each of the beds were shared by three or more family members as most tenements housed entire families that ranged from 8 to 10 members.

Traditional Housing at New Lanark

Traditional Housing at New Lanark

As the population of New Lanark declined over time, so the layout of the houses changed. Families would take over two rooms, sometimes even three, doors would be blocked up, new ones opened and most importantly, the house numbers would change with these alterations. Hence trying to match a key to a house is not as easy a task as it may seem!

Following a 40+ year restoration programme, all but one of the tenement blocks have now been restored (an the restoration of the last is underway).Today, there are 45 tenancies and 20 owner-occupied houses at New Lanark with a population of roughly 150-200 people who live here permanently. Mantila Row was unfortunately demolished during the restoration period as the building was unsafe but the exteriors of the other buildings remain pretty much unchanged. The keys however have got much smaller!

 

RESEARCH RESOURCES:

The Story of New Lanark, World Heritage Site

Living in New Lanark, New Lanark Conversation Trust

Historic New Lanark, Ian Donnachie & George Hewitt

 

Holly – New Lanark Archive Intern

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06/07/16 New Lanark World Heritage Site , SWT Falls of Clyde Visitor Centre and Wildlife Reserve # , , , , ,

Walkies! Dog days at the Falls of Clyde

Walkies! Dog days at the Falls of Clyde

Looking for a dog walk in Lanarkshire? The Falls of Clyde walkway at New Lanark is paw-fect! (excuse the pun)

New Lanark is an 18th century cotton spinning mill village nestled in a valley beside the River Clyde in Lanarkshire. Now one of Scotland’s 6 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, New Lanark and the Falls of Clyde is visited by thousands of walkers and their canine companions every year.

Now, for all the important stuff – New Lanark is located under 1 hour from Glasgow & Edinburgh beside the town of Lanark. To get here use the postcode ML11 9DB. On-site there is free parking, free toilets, lots of outdoor picnic areas as well as a large indoor café. There is also a fantastic shop, hotel and restaurant!

It’s advised that dogs are kept on a leash within New Lanark village, as this area is frequented by many visitors, residents and cars throughout the day.

The actual Falls of Clyde walk is a mostly pathed walk through forest next to the river. There are a couple of sandy beach areas at the side of the river with shallower water. Doggy towels at the ready!

This is a great article on Walkiees.co.uk which fully explains the walk.

Without further ado, here’s some fun photos to get tails wagging…

New Lanark day out ☀️💦

A photo posted by @katiewales on

🐾🌳💛 #newlanark #westie #sundays #dogwalk #bestfriend #boyfriend #fallsofclyde

A photo posted by Sarah McFadden (@mickeff) on

Cracking night for a walk #newlanark #boxerdog #boxersofinstagram

A photo posted by Scott Glover (@scottia8) on

Jake had a great day out in the sunshine at @newlanark !

A video posted by Elise (@eliseandlife) on

#newlanark #scotland #dog #goldenretriever #scenery #nofilter #photography #nikon #dslr #d5100

A photo posted by Jamie McInall (@jamiemci88) on

New Lanark Clyde walkway…. Hallie’s new favourite playground 🐾 @willbike #lanarkshire #newlanark #scotland

A photo posted by BlondieMac6 (@blondiemac6) on

 

Days with my #baby #doggy #fallsofclyde #lanark #sunshine

A photo posted by @missyneet82 on

That wee face! #NewLanark #walkway

A photo posted by Martin Finlay (@mjfinlay22) on

Disclaimer – towels may be required!

To find out more about New Lanark and walks to the Falls of Clyde please visit the New Lanark website. Alternatively you can call us on 01555 661345 or email [email protected]

Melissa – New Lanark Marketing and PR Officer

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04/07/16 New Lanark Ice Cream # , , , ,

Making New Lanark Ice Cream

Making New Lanark Ice Cream

New Lanark Ice Cream: award winning ice cream with a unique twist – it’s made and sold in a UNESCO World Heritage Site!

The ice cream here in New Lanark is made by the team: Andy Park and Ronnie North. Andy and Ronnie’s ice cream factory has been in New Lanark for roughly 2 months now as it was relocated from Lanark to New Lanark in May 2016. Both spent 3 and a half years in the Lanark ice cream factory. New Lanark’s ice cream is sold throughout central Scotland to hotels, restaurants and also to local butchers. Not only is the ice cream distributed outside of New Lanark but it is also sold on site and can be bought in the Mill Café, New Lanark Mill Hotel, Village Store and Wee Row Hostel. There is also a van down at a local garden centre, Dobbies, where you can find New Lanark’s ice cream.

Ice cream factory

The process of making the ice cream can take up to 10/14 hours and there are set days for doing each part of the process. The machinery down in the factory is modern and up to date, ensuring a high quality product is produced. The factory has large windows which allows you to see how the ice cream is made and we are looking to incorporate this into the guided tours of the village so visitors can see the ice cream production up close!

Andy and Ronnie are always looking for ways to expand New Lanark Ice Cream, and there are many exciting developments in the pipeline for the future!

 

Ice cream factory

Inside the Ice Cream factory

 

Ice cream in the factory

Ice cream in the factory freezer

What makes New Lanark ice cream unique?

New Lanark’s ice cream is unique and incomparable to any other ice cream brand because it is made and sold in New Lanark World Heritage Site. New Lanark ice cream is also full dairy and that is why it has such a lovely taste. Grahams (the Scottish family farming and dairy business) milk and butter is used when making the ice cream. This shows that the ice cream ingredients are from top quality farms and also that everything is kept local.

Awards

Now onto the awards! New Lanark ice cream has won many awards in the past several years, including overall champion prize at the Royal Highland Show in 2015 for the Simply Vanilla flavour. New Lanark ice cream is now up there with the very best of ice cream. Below is a list of all the awards that New Lanark ice cream has won recently…

Royal Highland Show 2016 – BronzeSimply Vanilla

Royal Highland Show 2016 – BronzeRaspberry Panna Cotta

Royal Highland Show 2016 – BronzeCandied Orange

Ice Cream Alliance Awards 2016 – Bronze MedalSimply Vanilla

Ice Cream Alliance Awards 2016 – Diplomas of MeritSimply Vanilla & Mascarpone and Strawberry

Ice Cream Alliance Awards 2016 – DiplomaPuff Candy

Royal Highland Show 2015 – Overall Champion Ice CreamSimply Vanilla

Royal Highland Show 2015 – GoldSimply Vanilla

Royal Highland Show 2015 – BronzeJammy Dodger

Ice Cream Alliance Awards 2015 – Diploma of MeritSimply Vanilla

Ice Cream Alliance Awards 2015 – DiplomasVanilla Pod & Jaffa Cake

Bronze medal award

Bronze medal award

 

 

New Lanark Ice Cream trophy

The trophy for Overall Champion Ice Cream at the Royal Highland Show 2015

Award certificates

New Lanark ice cream award certificates

Andy and Ronnie are both extremely proud of their achievements and receiving the awards. These awards speak for themselves, 11 awards in the past 2 years. New Lanark is now a serious name in the ice cream industry and have proven that they are up there with the best.

Andy and Ronnie

Andy and Ronnie

 

To find out more about enjoying New Lanark’s Ice Cream, visit the New Lanark Ice Cream page on the New Lanark website!

Ronan – New Lanark Marketing Intern

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01/07/16 Roof Garden

Roof Garden Diary: July 2016

Roof Garden Diary: July 2016

The tall burnet plant (Sanguisorba) has become very invasive in New Lanark Roof Garden so work has started on removing it from the areas where it is choking the other plants.  Additions to the planting this month include the pink-purple clematis ‘Dr Ruppel’ positioned where it can climb over the bare branches of a dead elder shrub.  And a new agapanthus ‘Charlotte’ adds a splash of blue with its large clusters of star-shaped flowers.  Along with some lupins and salvia, these flowers should provide extra nectar for the bees that are already enjoying the flat sheets of purple thyme in the troughs.

Find out more about visiting the New Lanark Roof Garden.

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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29/06/16 New Lanark Wool & Textiles # , , ,

Woollen Yarn Production at New Lanark!

Woollen Yarn Production at New Lanark!

Guest blog by Ronan Moore – New Lanark Marketing Intern

You may not know it, but New Lanark is still a working mill. What once started out as a small part of the restoration process and Visitor Centre experience has now became one of the core revenue generating activities for New Lanark Trust.  The village has reclaimed its title of being a spinning centre by using the same traditional methods using spinning woollen yarn instead of cotton and other modernistations along the way! The production is extremely efficient here in New Lanark and the woollen yarn produced can be recognised on a global scale. New Lanark’s wool has been used in a Harry Potter movie and Carbonised White woollen single ply yarn is added to other yarns and woven into cloth used by Chanel for their garments.

For some of our yarns we add silk our Donegal Silk range. In the silk range there will be up to 10% silk in the yarn.

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New Lanark’s Harry Potter Knitting Pattern

The Raw product

The New Lanark woollen yarn process begins in the basement of Mill3 with the raw prodcut – sheep fleece.  There are more than 60 different breeds of sheep in Britain, more than in any other country. Their wool is very different often depending on where they live, on hills or lower land, and some are naturally coloured. Different sheep also produce different quantities and weights of fleece. At New Lanark we work with a range of different fleece for different breeds, for example: Kent Romney, Shetland plus many more.

Our fleece is bought from a broker and arrives in large bales or bags which are stored in the basement of Mill 3, where most of the production takes place. Most of our fleece comes scoured (cleaned) and if we, or any of our commission customers, want the fleece dyed, it is done before it is delivered here. All of the brokers, scourers and dyers we use are based in Yorkshire. For some of our yarns we add silk (our Donegal Silk range) which softens the woollen yarn. In the silk range there may be up to 10% silk in the woollen yarn.

 

Blending

To create our woollen yarn range we work to a recipe book of finely tuned combinations of weights of different fleece. To create a batch of a particular yarn, particular amounts of specific wool shades are selected, weighed and blended. Our final shades have up to 7 different colours in them.

The fleece is weighed and laid out in a large metal vat on the floor, usually with lighter colours at the bottom. Vegetable-based Oil is then added to lubricate the wool and replace the natural lanolin which is removed during the scouring (cleaning) process. The blended wool is left to rest for around 8 hours (for 500 kilos) then transferred to a large metal Blend Room, ready for the next step – Carding. 

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Large Metal Vat where the oil is added to lubricate the fleece

 

Carding

Carding is the next stage of the woolen yarn production process, the carding machine is located in the ground floor of Mill 3 at New Lanark and can be seen by the public through a glass partition.  The carding machine continues to blend and refine the wool but the main job of the carding machine is to align the wool fibres. It does so by using its many hundreds of ‘teeth’ on the surface of the large rollers which comb and blend the fibres and colours together, and also remove any waste material – even particles of sand from the Shetland sheep’s fleece! The man who is in charge of the blending and the carding process is Robert.

 

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The end of the carding machine.

 

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Robert showing us how the carding process is done!

 

Spinning

Then we move on to the Spinning floor! This is the main part of the woollen yarn production process, that visitors can see at New Lanark as part of the Visitor Centre experience and is located on Level 4 of Mill 3. The traditional methods are still in place with spinning as you will be able to see with the Headstock.

The Headstock is what keeps the process moving and can be described as a large gear. To simplify the process, the carded spool feeds out,is spun  out and wound onto a pirn Scott, who has worked here for five years works on the spinning mule and was kind enough to show us how it works!

The spinning mule is stopped regularly to check the quality of production in order to make sure they are the correct thickness and that they are even.

Scott operating the spinning machine. Notice the Headstock behind him.

Scott operating the spinning machine. Notice the Headstock behind him.

 

A close up view of the pirns on the Spinning Mule

A close up view of the pirns on the Spinning Mule

 

A pirn full with wool is called a Cop

A Pirn ‘full’ with wool is called a ‘Cop’

 

Winding & Plying

Once the cops are created they are sent through to the savio machine, also known as the winding machine. There are 8 units for cones on the machine and it takes 18-20 cops to make 1 cone. This machine ensures the quality of our yarn and removes any knots or inconsistencies. Unfortunately, this machine is not on public display.

Savio machine creating cones

The Savio ‘winding’ machine creating single ply cones

 

Once the cops are created they are sent through to the Savio winding machine .There are 8 units for cones on the machine and it takes 8-10 cops to make 1 cone. This machine ensures the quality of our yarn and removes any knots or inconsistencies. Unfortunately, this machine is not on public display.

 Once the cones are produced, they are either stored until ready to be used or sent directly back over to the Twisting Frame. The twisting frame’s purpose is to create the thickness (or ply) intended for the type of wool the customer would like. Single thread(1 strand), Double Knitting (2 strands), Aran (3 strands), Chunky (4 strands)

The Twisting Frame where individual strands are twisted to create the desired thickness of yarn

The Twisting Frame where individual strands are twisted to create the desired thickness of yarn

 

Hanking

One of the last processes is the Hanking Machine which does exactly what you would think, it creates hanks. The Hanker rolls yarn into big loops that weight just over 1 kilo and then they are sent down to Yorkshire to be cleaned/scoured.

The Hanking Machine- customers can purchase hanks or hanks can also be balled

The Hanking Machine- customers can purchase hanks or hanks can also be balled

This is what a Hank of yarn looks like!

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The Finished Product

We sell our finished product in many ways – in our Mill Shop, at Trade Shows, via our online shop and to wholesalers or commission customers.

 

Stockroom of New Lanark wool cones

Stockroom of New Lanark wool cones

The Mill Shop's New Lanark Wool & Textiles department

The Mill Shop’s New Lanark Wool & Textiles department

The quickest turnaround from start, blending, to finished product including hanking and balling, is 6 weeks. However, as New Lanark has a wide range of shades available, it could take a few months for a specific shade to be reproduced if our production schedule is full.

All proceeds from the sale of our wool and textiles are returned to New Lanark Trust to be reinvested in the care and development of New Lanark World Heritage Site.

 

The New Lanark Textiles team - Robert, Colin, Jim, Alan, Scott, Stewart and Wilma (Janice not pictured)

The New Lanark Textiles team – Robert, Colin, Jim, Alan, Scott, Stewart and Wilma (Janice not pictured)

 

You can read a lot more about the production of New Lanark wool on the ‘Wool Process’ page of New Lanark’s online shop. 

Ronan – New Lanark Marketing Intern

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New Lanark World Heritage Site Aerial View

New Lanark is a beautifully restored 18th century cotton mill village in Scotland, and is one of Scotland's six UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

On our blog you'll find a behind-the-scenes look at all the latest news, events, stories and general 'goings-on' from New Lanark World Heritage Site.

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