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26/08/16 Roof Garden # , , , ,

Visit Lanarkshire filming at New Lanark

Visit Lanarkshire filming at New Lanark

Visit Lanarkshire would struggle to chose a better day to film down here at New Lanark than yesterday!(24/08/2016) The sun was shining whilst the Falls of the Clyde generated a cool, refreshing breeze… perfect conditions for filming!

A team of 8 from film production company Seventh Crow came down to New Lanark yesterday on behalf of Visit Lanarkshire to film part of a series of promotional films for great days out in North and South Lanarkshire. We were able to watch from behind the scenes of the filming and have a glimpse of what it is like to be part of the film crew. Two locations where used in New Lanark: the Roof Garden and the steps at the beginning of the walk to the Falls of the Clyde. New Lanark are honoured to be a chosen location by Visit Lanarkshire for the filming.

The filming on the Roof Garden was of a lady relaxing reading through a book in the sunshine, whilst she wore a distinctively large hat.

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The second location was the actor walking up to the Falls of the Clyde. As you can see below the actor walking beside the Clyde as the film crew follow with precision. Both sides had to be temporarily closed off to avoid any interruptions.

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I was able to speak to the crew and the actor who were telling me that it is great to get out to places like New Lanark as not all of them had been before. They named other locations in North and South Lanarkshire that they were going to film, one of them being Chatelherault!

Visit Lanarkshire expect to have their filming submitted by late September, therefore, the film will hopefully be online by October! We really enjoyed having Visit Lanarkshire here at New Lanark and are looking forward to seeing the finished product.

If you are interesting in undertaking professional filming or photography at New Lanark please email [email protected] and we’d be delighted to discuss your requirements.

Ronan Moore – New Lanark Marketing Intern

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25/08/16 New Lanark Mill Shop # , , , ,

The Mill Shop: From Scotland with Love

The Mill Shop: From Scotland with Love

The New Lanark Mill Shop offers a superb range of contemporary gifts, homeware, books, fashions & accessories. On top of all that, the Mill Shop also stocks a fantastic range of Scottish produce – from jewellery to honey! As the Mill Shop is located within New Lanark, one of Scotland’s 6 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, we are dedicated to showcasing the ‘best of Scotland’ to the thousands of visitors who come to New Lanark every year. As well as being a great place for visitors to pick up souvenirs, the shop is also ‘more than just a gift shop’ and with new ranges being launched all the time, is the perfect destination shopping location for local shoppers!

Here is a selection of some of the range of Scottish products currently stocked in the Mill Shop

 

The Organic Tartan

The New Lanark Mill Shop is also the home of the world’s first Organic Tartan, which is exclusively sold here through a range of beautiful throws, bags, purses and accessories.

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Heathergems

Heathergems is a unique and imaginative range of Scottish jewellery and giftware, made in Pitlochry, Scotland from natural heather stems. They are the only manufacturers of this unique Scottish product anywhere in the world.

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New Lanark Ice Cream

Not quite sold in the Mill Shop, our award-winning New Lanark Ice Cream is sold right next door in the Mill Café and across the village in the Village Store!

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Wrap pins, brooches and jewellery designed and hand made in Scotland by Maggie Lord. Individually created making each piece unique and hand painted in her own distinctive art style.

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The Scottish Fine Soaps Company

“We’ve been making our beautiful products since 1974. All of our products are made in Scotland, at our factory near the Ochil Hills in Stirlingshire. At The Scottish Fine Soaps Company, we blend gorgeous ingredients with contemporary Scottish style to create bath and beauty collections that will make you look, feel and smell fantastic. Since our family business was founded over 40 years ago, we’ve been searching Scotland and the world for inspirational ingredients with unique fragrances and beauty benefits.”

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Pewtermill Crafts

Pewtermill Crafts are a small family business established in 1960 by David Harkinson producing fine quality polished pewter jewellery and giftware. Each piece comes boxed and carries the touch marks of the Assosciation of British Craftsmen and of Pwetermill – as recoded on the Touch Plate of the Company of Pewteresrs at a grand ceremony in London in 2003.

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The Just Slate Company

Stunning range of slate tableware, slate gifts and slate homeware. All slate is natural and hand-cut in Scotland to fit with our contemporary designs. From our workshops in Scotland we hand-cut each individual slate piece to fit with our contemporary designs. By striking the raw slate correctly a skilled craftsman or women can split the layers to create a flat surface with the detailed “riven” edge surround.

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COCO Chocolatier

“Coco is an Artisan Chocolatier based in Edinburgh that specializes in making ethically traded, organic and most importantly delicious chocolate. Coco was established in 2004 as one of Scotland’s first chocolatiers. Now the Company has two gorgeous shops, on Bruntsfield and Stockbridge & a specialist Chocolate Kitchen in Summerhall, Edinburgh.”

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Plan Bee  – Scottish Honey

“Plan Bee Ltd is the fastest way to make a natural positive impact on your local environment. From our beehives, we produce premium grade bespoke honey from quintessential locations around Scotland. The important differentiator from our competitors is that our honey is cold extracted, minimally filtered and unpasteurized which is sustainable in its production and inherently proud of its origin. We also sell products of the hive including pollen, propolis and honeycomb.”

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Harris Tweed Range

“From time immemorial, the inhabitants of the Outer Hebrides of Scotland have woven a beautiful and intricate cloth the world knows simply as Harris Tweed. The islanders of Lewis, Harris, Uist and Barra produce this luxury cloth entirely by hand and have long been known for the excellence of their weaving. However up until the middle of the nineteenth century, their cloth was used only on their crofts or sold at local markets, but in 1846, Lady Dunmore, widow of the landowner of Harris, the Earl of Dunmore, chose to have their clan tartan replicated by Harris weavers in tweed. ”

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New Lanark Wool & Textiles

Taking centre stage in the Mill Shop is New Lanark Wool & Textiles which includes yarn produced on site, knitting kits and a selection of textiles. New Lanark Wool & Textiles is a small-scale producer of high quality Chunky, Aran, Double Knitting and Organic woollen yarn. Our wool is produced using very traditional methods on a 19th century spinning mule, which is powered by renewable energy from our own hydro-electricity production. We are very proud of the fact that we are a “Green Energy Site”.

Complete knitting kits

 

The Mill Shop is open 7 days a week! 9am-5pm Monday-Saturday and 10am-5pm on Sunday. Click here to find out more about visiting. 

Don’t forget to ask about the Mill Shop’s new Loyalty Cards!

Melissa – New Lanark Marketing and PR Officer

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22/08/16 New Lanark World Heritage Site # , , , , ,

Day trips to escape Edinburgh

Day trips to escape Edinburgh

After a buzzing August in the capital we’re now coming to the last week of the Edinburgh Fringe Festival and The Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo!  This year the Fringe will have seen 50,266 performances of 3,269 shows from 48 countries in 294 venues across Scotland’s capital city.(Edinburgh Guide). If you have travelled to Edinburgh to soak up the fantastic atmosphere & performances, or if you’ve taken up residence in the city you’ll no doubt be ready for a break soon! Luckily for you there are a range of fantastic days out around an hour from Edinburgh, many of which will feel like a different world compared to the crowded streets of Edinburgh in August.

 

New Lanark World Heritage Site (33.8 miles from Edinburgh)

Don’t miss your chance to visit one of Scotland’s 6 UNESCO World Heritage Sites! New Lanark is an 18th century mill village by the famous Falls of Clyde waterfalls which has been beautifully restored as a living, working community. The Visitor Centre, Shop & Café are open 7 days a week and there’s no charge to enter the Falls of Clyde Wildlife Reserve for fantastic woodland walks.

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Image credit: New Lanark Trust

 

Stirling Castle (40 miles from Edinburgh)

Enter the world of Scotland’s Renaissance kings and queens and discover a world of colour, splendour and glorious craftsmanship.

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Image credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stirling_Castle

 

National Museum of Flight (22 miles from Edinburgh)

Wing your way to one of Scotland’s top days out at the National Museum of Flight, East Fortune Airfield.

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Image credit: https://www.visitscotland.com/info/see-do/national-museum-of-flight-p251691

 

Linlithgow Palace (18.5 miles from Edinburgh)

Explore the magnificent ruins of the birthplace of Mary Queen of Scots. Linlithgow Palace was built and added to over two centuries by the Stewart kings, resulting in a superb Renaissance residence.

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Image credit: https://www.visitscotland.com/info/see-do/linlithgow-palace-p252271

 

Melrose Abbey (38.8 miles from Edinburgh)

Discover a place so beloved by Robert the Bruce, he chose it as the final resting place for his heart. Melrose Abbey is a magnificent ruin on a grand scale, and it was a highly desirable place to be buried.

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Image credit: https://www.visitscotland.com/info/see-do/melrose-abbey-p247611

 

Find out more about incorporating a visit to New Lanark during your trip to Edinburgh

Melissa – New Lanark Marketing and PR Officer

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19/08/16 CAVLP # , , ,

FREE Woodland family fun for award-winning play area

FREE Woodland family fun for award-winning play area

Families are being invited to join in with FREE celebrations for award-winning Clearburn Natural Play Area’s Second Birthday Bash at New Lanark World Heritage Site, on Saturday 10 September, 1 – 3pm.

The FREE family drop-in sessions will include a variety of woodland themed fun and games, including ‘Fab Foraging’ woodland scavenger hunt with Scottish Wildlife Trust Falls of Clyde, Woodland-Walk Storytelling with Mr Fox and Bunny Foo Foo from Storyteller Allison Galbraith and woodland crafts from local artist Shirley Marzella.

No birthday celebration would be complete without balloons and cake – fairy cakes will be available for the first families who turn up on the day.

Clearburn Natural Play Area, comprised of adventure play areas, a giant willow storytelling dome and stage, a burn, a secret hideaway tree house, campfire and bug hotels amongst other features, was created in the heart of New Lanark World Heritage Site in September 2014 as a Big Lottery and Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP) funded project.

“In two years, Clearburn has become an important part of the local community,” says Jane Masters, Heritage Manager at New Lanark Trust. She continues: “It is used extensively by local schools, nurseries and families, as well as visitors to New Lanark. People can always be found playing in Clearburn – it’s a testament to the fantastic design of the space which incorporates natural areas as well as built structures.”

The design of the play space was led by children from New Lanark Primary School, Robert Owen Memorial Primary School and Lanark Primary School, with involvement from 60 members of the local community, from the initial consultations right through to implementation. The names of school children involved in the projects were carved into a bench beside the willow tunnel so that their contributions will be remembered for years to come.

Since opening, the play area has scooped three prestigious awards; ‘Best Picnic Area within a UK Heritage Location’ at the Hudson’s Heritage Awards (2016), ‘Commendation for a Community Play Space within a National Tourist Attraction’ Nancy Ovens Play Award (2015) and ‘High Commendation’ in the Scottish Civic Trust ‘My Place’ Awards (2015).

Clearburn Natural Play Area is part of a wider initiative in the Clyde and Avon Valley focussing on wild play and connecting families with nature, such as the Growing Up Wild play sessions at RSPB Baron’s Haugh, Mauldslie Woodlands and Lesmahagow during the summer holidays.

Karen Dobbins, CAVLP Development Officer, said: “We are delighted to be involved in the celebrations with New Lanark Trust. A key focus for a number of CAVLP projects is to create opportunities for natural play and Clearburn is a fantastic asset to the area.”

She continues: “Surrounded by woodland and with the Clear burn itself flowing through the play area, it allows safe access for children to ‘play wild’ and explore the natural environment. It really is something to celebrate.”

The Clearburn second birthday bash is a FREE, family drop-in event on Saturday 10 September, 1 – 3pm.

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19/08/16 CAVLP # , , , ,

Lanark Library to host Mapping the Past Exhibition and Guide Launch

Lanark Library to host Mapping the Past Exhibition and Guide Launch

Members of the public are invited to attend the FREE Mapping the Past pop-up exhibition and guide launch will take place on Monday 12 September, at Lanark Library.

The exhibition and guide explores the unique cartographic heritage of the Clyde and Avon Valley and a 2000 year history of mapping in Scotland, including connections to the Father of Modern Mapping, Carluke born Major-General William Roy and local sites of interest, such as the area’s trig pillars.

The exhibition, first displayed in Carluke earlier in the year, also showcases artwork created by local community groups, schools and Guide and Scout groups as part of the Mapping the Past Project. The project was undertaken by CAVLP Heritage, managed by Northlight Heritage and supported by Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP) and Historic Environment Scotland.

“The creative maps are a wonderful addition to the more traditional elements of the exhibition,” explains Karen McCusker, CAVLP Heritage Project Officer. “We started the workshops by exploring the legacy of mapping survey techniques and the first Ordnance Survey maps that Major-General William Roy produced, before creating personalised and expressive maps based in the Clyde and Avon Valley.”

Visitors to the exhibition are encouraged to take home copies of the Mapping the Past Guide, which offers details about the mapping heritage of the Clyde and Avon Valley. The guide will be available as a digital trail from www.clydeandavonvalley.org/trails from September 12 onward.

“The guide includes three trails and is a great way for all to get out and explore the mapping heritage of the Clyde and Avon Valley,” says Gavin McGregor, Project Manager at Northlight Heritage. “It takes you on journeys between trig pillars, historic sites and even includes Alasdair Gray’s fantastic 1969 ‘Falls of Clyde’ mural at the Kirkfieldbank Tavern.”

The Mapping the Past exhibition and guide launch corresponds with the 80th birthday celebrations of the Trig Pillar this year. The first trig pillar was built by the Ordnance Survey in 1936. These pillars aided in the triangulation of Britain, which was vitally important to the creation of accurate maps of the country.  Around 6500 of these Trig Pillars were constructed, and from 1936 to 1962, OS surveyors gathered measurements to create a highly accurate map of Britain. Approximately 6000 of these still remain – two of which are in the Clyde and Avon Valley area at Black Hill and Milton Head.

The exhibition runs from Monday 12 – Friday 30 September at Lanark Library. It will be open Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 9:15am – 5pm, Tuesday 9:15 – 8pm, Friday 10am – 5pm and Saturday 9:15 – 5pm. The exhibition will be closed on Sundays.

The exhibition precedes the launch of the Local Landscape Heroes CAVLP Heritage project later in September. This volunteer led project will celebrate the artists, writers, designers, architects and ordinary people of the Clyde and Avon valley who shaped the landscape and cultural heritage that defines the area as we know it today.

To find out more about CAVLP Heritage projects and how you can get involved, visit www.clydeandavonvalley.org. You can contact the team at [email protected] or on 01555 663 430. Follow them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/CAVLPHeritage or on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/CAVLPHeritage to keep up to date with events and workshops.

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16/08/16 SWT Falls of Clyde Visitor Centre and Wildlife Reserve # , , , ,

Evening walk to Corra Linn

Evening walk to Corra Linn

We’re enjoying a spell of beautiful weather in Scotland at the moment, so we decided to make the most of it by going on an evening walk to see the Falls of Clyde last night.

These magnificent waterfalls on the River Clyde have been impressing visitors for centuries – from Wordsworth to Coleridge, and J. M. W. Turner to Sir Walter Scott. The four linn (Scots: waterfalls) compromise of the upper falls of Bonnington Linn, Corra Linn, Dundaff Linn, and the lower falls of Stonebyres Linn. Corra Linn is the highest, with a fall of 84 feet. Bonnington Linn (fall of 30 feet), Corra Linn and Dundaff Linn (fall of 10 feet) are above New Lanark and located within the Falls of Clyde Reserve managed by the Scottish Wildlife Trust, a national nature conservation charity. Stonebyres Linn is located several miles downstream from the reserve and New Lanark.

Visitors can enjoy walks within the native woodlands, spotting wildlife and wondering at the flora & fauna all around them. Look our for kingfishers, otters, deer and badgers!

Dundaff Linn can be seen from the far end of New Lanark village. From there it is around a 20-30 minute walk along the river boardwalk until you arrive at Corra Linn. It is then another 20-30 minutes before you arrive at Bonnington Linn. (in total this route is 3 miles)

Here are a selection of our photos from last night’s walk! Plan your own visit at www.newlanark.org where there’s also a handy map!

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Find out more about visiting New Lanark and the Falls of Clyde.

Melissa – Marketing and PR Officer

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16/08/16 Double Row Restoration Project # , , ,

Windows Workshop!

On Thursday, the 17th of July, a group of 10 went on a windows workshop. This workshop allowed us to grasp an understanding of what the sash and case windows are like, since they are used all around New Lanark! We were shown by two experts of historic buildings/windows each aspect of the windows and learned about the history. The sash and case windows were very popular across Scotland and were installed in the 1680’s and 1690’s. Throughout the following centuries the windows began to develop and additions were added to them in order for them to be more efficient for people’s homes. For example, pulleys and weights were introduced in the late seventeenth century in order to make the windows more efficient. We were told, originally, that all the windows would have been made with local resources, such as: wood from the surrounding forests of New Lanark. There was a time when the wood was extremely cheap to buy and the glass itself was so expensive. When people sold their houses they would sell the house but take the glass from the windows with you.

The separate parts of the windows

The separate parts of the windows

The workshop tour began with a display of many parts to a sash and case window. All parts were laid out on a table for us to see and we were also able to interact with them, by picking them up to feel the weight and texture of the parts to the window! Each aspect was then described to us and we were shown what each part would be used for. After the initial workshop we took a well-earned tea break…

After a short break we started the tour again. Full of tea and biscuits, the 10 of us headed to the first window of the Millworkers’ Houses. This was used as an example for the sash and case windows as we were able to take an up close look at the window itself. If you looked closely you were able to see the red lead used when fitting the windows during the time of the restoration. Red lead was used for all windows and those who earned more money paid for the window fitters to use a different colour of lead so they could differentiate themselves. The sash and case windows were described as “Henry Ford production lines” which means that the windows were just a standard style and were produced in bulk without any specialised styling.

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Mill Workers House window

Mill Workers House window

 

Demonstrating the red lead on the windows.

Demonstrating the red lead on the windows.

 

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Do  you see the red lead?

Once we viewed the windows at the Mill Worker houses, we then moved down to counting house where we had a look at all the windows from a distance. Viewing the windows from a distance allowed us to see how the brick work around each of the windows were rarely the same. This suggests that during restoration they did not care about all the brickwork around the windows looking the exact same.

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Heading to the Counting House!

The tour provided us with a better understanding of how the windows in New Lanark were made and why they were so popular.

Ronan Moore – New Lanark Marketing Intern

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03/08/16 Roof Garden # , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: August 2016

Roof Garden Diary: August 2016

The swallow chicks in the nest under the Roof Garden viewing platform fledged successfully in the last week of July.   These baby swallows represent the sixth generation of their kind to be born and raised in New Lanark Roof Garden.  The Scottish Wildlife Trust identified them as swallows (as opposed to martins or swifts) from the reddish-russet colouring on their throats.  An amazing characteristic of these beautiful birds is their ability to feed while on the wing.  As they swoop through the air, they hoover up hundreds of midges so they are definitely our friends!  Soon even the young ones will be migrating many miles south to Africa for the winter, and with luck will return next spring as soon as the weather begins to warm up again.

Find out more about visiting the New Lanark Roof Garden. 

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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01/08/16 Events at New Lanark , New Lanark World Heritage Site # , ,

The Antiques Roadshow came to town!

The Antiques Roadshow came to town!

New Lanark was the BBC’s ninth location for The Antiques Roadshow on Thursday the 28th of August, 2016. Thousands from around the country came to New Lanark to witness the experts from the show value antiques brought to them by the public – with a little help from Fiona Bruce!

The process, for those of you who do not watch the show, is that anyone can come down with any antique and meet an expert of the show who listens to their story and values their antiques. The show has had many success stories in the past of people realising their antique is worth much more than they thought. We even had some success stories on our day, for example, Mr and Mrs Berkley were the owners of a set of Japanese chairs who were left in Mr Berkley family home when they moved in. The chairs turned out to be worth £1,500. The expert also said that identical chairs had been spotted in the palace of the Sultan of Selangor state, Malaysia.

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Japanese chairs from 1910

Another success story was from Primilia, who lives in Lanark, who brought along a Dumb Waiter Statue that her parents were given as a wedding gift in 1933. The antique was a success as it was valued as more than she had anticipated. Primilia was filmed with her antique and left New Lanark with a smile on her face!

The owner of this Grandfather clock also discovered that his possession was worth more than he originally thought! Not only did the gentleman discover the price but he also found out more information about the previous owner of the clock. I guess his visit was certainly worth his time…

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The Lanark Silver Bell: one of the oldest racing trophies in Europe, made between the years of 1608 and 1610. Lanark’s oldest antique which can be deemed as priceless.

The Lanark Silver Bell

The Silver Bell was a trophy given to the race winner. The earliest silver shield is dated 1628 and is engraved ‘John Hamilton of Traboun’. The holes in the bell were for the rings which used to hold the shields. Due to the number of the shields rising the Victorian silver stand was added.

The event was enjoyed by all as these are just some of the comments left on our Facebook page…

“Thanks for a fab day out!!”

“Great day out and weather was much better than forecast.”

“had a great day”

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Each expert has their own specialised field, therefore, they have their own table for said field. All around the site there were tables with the iconic red umbrellas and the respective name of department on top. So each person would queue for their ticket and be directed to whatever section their antique falls into. The Miscellaneous area was the busiest of them all as that had four tables worth of experts!

In order to organise and arrange such an event a lot of planning and effort has to go into it. On Wednesday, the 27th, both the BBC and New Lanark staff were here setting up from the early hours of the morning in order to make sure the day was a success.  The event could not have been run without the help of our volunteers who are avid fans of the show. Each volunteer had a certain area where they would help keep the queues moving efficiently and also provided much needed tea and coffee for the experts!

 

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VIP Tour

Once the event was in full swing, I was lucky enough to join a certain group for a VIP tour, hosted by a member of the BBC production team. The tour allowed us to see behind the scenes of the Antiques Roadshow including the make-up room and the tents where the production team would listen and dictate the recordings. Those on the tour were New Lanark Trustees and some members of parliament.

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We started off our tour by standing on the PODA and get a brief understanding of what the tour would entail.

DSC_0151We then made our way over to the production tent where producers were listening to the recordings so we had to be quiet. We even managed to get up close to some filming!

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We even managed to get a glimpse of some filming up close!

After this we went into the make-up room to see those who were preparing to be on camera. We then headed back over to the PODA and spotted Fiona Bruce welcoming visitors and helping out with reception.

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Overall, the Antiques Roadshow was a complete success and the weather stayed dry, well… for the majority of the day! Below are some more pictures of the event! Be sure to keep your eye out for Antiques Roadshow on TV, as the series is on in September!

Photo credit Frances Shanks 2 IMG_3692 IMG_3652 IMG_3633 Filming with the Falls in the background

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Fancy visiting New Lanark when the BBC isn’t in town? Visit out website to find out more! 

Ronan Moore – New Lanark Marketing Intern

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01/08/16 New Lanark Wool & Textiles # , ,

New Lanark Organic Tartan

New Lanark Organic Tartan

New Lanark is home to the world’s first Organic Tartan. The Organic Tartan is certified by the Soil Association. The tartan is made using 100% organic wool from HRH The Prince of Wale’s flock at Duchy Home Farm, in Gloucestershire. Our tartan here in New Lanark is a blue/green colour with a subtle purple and a hint of yellow shining through – shades all inspired by the River Clyde and New Lanark’s woodland surroundings.

Why do we have Organic Tartan?

New Lanark introduced the Organic Tartan range in order to honour our Scottish connections. The unveiling of the tartan was on the 27th of November 2015, just before St. Andrews Day. The Organic Tartan represents New Lanark, not just due to the colours included in it but also because of the uniqueness that the tartan has to offer. Both New Lanark and the Organic Tartan are unique in their own ways, however, can both represent each other in their own way.

What is the Organic Tartan being used for?

New Lanark Organic Tartan is currently sold in the New Lanark Mill Shop and is sold through a variety of products such as: throws, bags, purses and cushions.IMG_3154 IMG_3155

The Organic Tartan Process

The process for the organic tartan is completely UK based as all the stages for it take part in different locations of Britain. First of all, the wool originates from Duchy Home Farm, Gloucestershire. It is then sent to Hawarth Scouring in Bradford to be scoured. The wool is then blended, carded and spun into top quality yarn using traditional methods on the historic machinery here at New Lanark World Heritage Site. The yarn is then sent to Bradford to be dyed at Paint Box Textiles and finally finished by Schofield of Galashiels.

Below are pictures off the organic wool being woven into the tartan…

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As you can see there are many steps during the process of the wool being woven. Each step is carefully monitored and manned to ensure the best quality of tartan is being produced.

Be sure to have a look at our Organic Tartan in the Mill Shop on your next visit to New Lanark World Heritage Site!

Ronan Moore – Marketing Intern

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New Lanark World Heritage Site Aerial View

New Lanark is a beautifully restored 18th century cotton mill village in Scotland, and is one of Scotland's six UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

On our blog you'll find a behind-the-scenes look at all the latest news, events, stories and general 'goings-on' from New Lanark World Heritage Site.

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