New Lanark World Heritage Site Blog

30/07/15 Ted at New Lanark # , , , , , ,

Ted’s July at New Lanark

Ted’s July at New Lanark

Hi everyone! I hope you’ve all had a good summer so far! The wet weather we’ve been having hasn’t stopped me exploring New Lanark and this month I’ve been busy checking out Wee Row Hostel, the latest exhibition in the Gallery Room and peeking at my reflection in New Lanark Ice Cream’s huge trophy from the Royal Highland Show!

In my last blog I was telling you about Live at New Lanark at the end of June, so I thought I’d show you a photo of the great day it turned out to be! Nearly 300 people came down to Robert Owen’s Garden to listen to the brilliant music from 15 local bands & artists. You can listen to this podcast by bloggers Scots Whay Hae to hear interviews with some of the performers. I can’t wait for next year’s event that’s going to be even bigger and better!

Ted enjoying Live at New Lanark

Hanging out backstage with the Live at New Lanark crew!

 

On 19th July I got my picnic ready (jam sandwiches for me please!) and took my very own teddy to the BIG Picnic at New Lanark! The fun activities had to move indoors because of the weather, but everyone still had a great time with over 700 people attending the event! My favourite part was the Birds of Prey in the garden, but there was also Face painting, Balloon modelling, Storytelling and a Teddy Bear’s Picnic Trail!

Ted at the Big Picnic

Meeting up with some old friends at the Big Picnic

 

Last week I popped over to Wee Row Hostel at New Lanark. It’s now independently owned and operated by New Lanark Trust, but it’s still an affiliate member of the Scottish Youth Hostel Association. Wee Row Hostel has a selection of 18 rooms (Double, Triple, Quad, Studio) – all of which have views of the River Clyde, along with loads of other facilities like a self-catering kitchen, dining room, TV lounge, laundry, internet access, lockers, bike store & meeting room! Wee Row Hostel is popular with individual travellers, families, small and large groups – making a stay here a really unique and interesting experience. Let’s take a look around…

Ted at Wee Row Hostel

Checking out Wee Row Hostel!

Ted in the Wee Row Hostel dining area

Plenty of seats in the Dining Area to enjoy your tea

Ted sitting in Wee Row Hostel

…comfy couches too!

Ted in the TV room

Taking a break in the TV Room …now where’s the remote?

Food posters at Wee Row Hostel

Sounds tasty!

Outside Wee Row Hostel

Outside Wee Row Hostel

View of River Clyde from Wee Row Hostel

The view’s not bad either!

 

After all that exploring I thought I deserved a treat so I headed over to the Mill Café to try some of their award winning Simply Vanilla Ice Cream! It recently scooped two fantastic awards at the Royal Highland Show 2015 including ‘Gold’ in the Vanilla Flavour Class and ‘Overall Champion Ice Cream’ – beating off competition from some of the top ice cream producers across Scotland. I may be biased but I can say it’s the best ice cream this bear has ever tasted!

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Now THAT’S a big cup…I wonder how much ice cream it can hold!

Don't mind if I do!

Don’t mind if I do!

 

If you’re thinking of visiting New Lanark in the next couple of weeks be sure to pop up to the Gallery Room to check out the current ‘World Wide Weave’ exhibition. This exhibition has been put together by Peter Bateson to celebrate the Camphill Foundation’s 75th anniversary and features fantastic textile art from Camphill communities around the world. Entry is free and the exhibition is open every day from 10am-5pm until Thursday 6th August.

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World Wide Weave exhibition at New Lanark!

 

 

Coming up at New Lanark is a unique performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream on Saturday 15th August! This will be performed by the four strong, mad-cap HandleBards who travel the country carrying all their props and costumes on their bikes – phew! Tickets for the performance are £10 for Adults and £5 for under 16s. You can find out more here and purchase tickets online or by calling 01555 661345.

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The madcap HandleBards!

 

That’s all for now – here’s hoping the sun comes out for the rest of July! 🙂

Ted – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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28/07/15 Exhibitions at New Lanark # , , , , ,

The Quaker Tapestry at New Lanark

The Quaker Tapestry at New Lanark

New Lanark Guest Blog

by Bridget Guest, Manager of the Quaker Tapestry

“Is there anything I can do to help you?” I hesitantly asked the visitor who was in tears in front of one of the Tapestry panels… she was alright – just a little overwhelmed by the emotion of seeing something she had been longing to see. The visitor, a woman of about my age, was from Australia and had heard so much about the Quaker Tapestry but the experience of seeing the panels ‘in the flesh’ exceeded all her expectations.

The Quaker Tapestry definitely has a wow factor – but, I hasten to add, doesn’t always bring on a flood of tears!  The vibrancy and richness of the colours are not possible to portray in print or film – you really do need to see the embroideries.

‘Inspirational’ is the word most often used by visitors to describe it, with the ability to ‘speak’ to people in different ways. As one person, on a third visit, explained: “The first time I saw it – I read all the written information in the panels and the inspirational quotes; the second time I enjoyed the storytelling quality of the panels and was surprised at how much of the social history I didn’t know; and this time I have actually noticed the stitches!”

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I have been working with the Quaker Tapestry since 1994 when we established the permanent home for the exhibition in Kendal, Cumbria. With a background in art, design, illustration and a love of all textiles, when I spend time with the panels I am usually examining the embroidery stitches. Just how many colours of wool does it take to create an evocative sunset, what brilliance produced a three dimensional engine funnel or created a perspective in a landscape that allows you to see for miles?

It wasn’t until February 2001, that I became absorbed by the stories and social history within the Quaker Tapestry. We were exhibiting the Tapestry at Beverley Minster the hometown of Ann Nichols, one of the four main teachers who enabled the 4,000 men, woman and children to create the 77 Quaker Tapestry panels between 1981 and 1996. Ann is such a wonderful storyteller and has the ability to gently reel-in her audience. She had gathered a class of 9-year-old school children around her and one of the panels. You could have heard a pin drop as they sat with open mouths on the stone floor of the dimly lit Minster, listening to the tale of Richard Sellar, a young sailor from Scarborough who was press ganged to fight in the 17th century Dutch War.

A 19-year-old Quaker, Richard refused to fight and as a result he was made an example of by the captain with punishments such as keelhauling and hanging by his thumbs from the yardarm and whipping “until the blood ran red over his back”. Ann’s years in teaching had given her the skills to enthral the children as they listened to every gruesome detail. Children of their age had illustrated and embroidered the story at the bottom of this panel. Little hands went up to answer her carefully crafted open questions about how they might feel if those gory things had happened to them.   I was also enthralled at Ann’s delivery and I hadn’t noticed that my partner Roy had grabbed a blanket from the back of the shop to creep up behind the group of children at the end of the story and surprise us all by throwing the blanket over them with a loud shout of “here comes the pressgang!!” Needless to say, the screams of fright, surprise and laughter helped to lighten the mood.

Richard Sellar’s story stayed with me for several weeks and Roy and I were inspired to write a song about him. This led on to other research and song writing until we found we had an album of songs inspired by the Quaker Tapestry entitled ‘Universal Chorus’.  In another life Roy and I sing as a duo on the Folk scene and our claim to fame is that we sang the title song from the album on the BBC TV programme Songs of Praise in 2002!

Over the years the Quaker Tapestry and its stories of remarkable people have inspired all sorts of people to produce: poetry, song, theatre, other textile projects small and large, Scottish dances, music, sculpture, university students and lecturers, films, books and TV programmes… to name a few!

See the Quaker Tapestry at New Lanark in August – but beware…. this community textile has the ability to inspire and change lives! Exhibition open at New Lanark from Tuesday 11th to Saturday 29th August.


Come along to hear Bridget tell you more about the fascinating stories of the Quaker Tapestry and anecdotes of the people who made it. It may inspire you to do something wonderful.

Bridget’s talk – Friday 28th August 2015, Robert Owen’s School for Children, 6.30 for 7.30pm. Tickets £4, available by calling 01555 661345 or online. 

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Quaker Tapestry Museum in Kendal is open February to December each year for more information about this and embroidery workshops visit the website: http://www.quaker-tapestry.co.uk

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23/07/15 Exhibitions at New Lanark # , , , ,

‘World Wide Weave’ arrives in New Lanark

‘World Wide Weave’ arrives in New Lanark

Guest blog by Peter Bateson – Development Coordinator and Exhibition Curator for the Camphill Foundation…

A collection of vibrant pieces of textile art created in Camphill communities across the globe will be on display for two weeks in New Lanark’s visitor centre. After more than a year of preparation, and seven months of touring in England and Wales, Camphill Foundation’s World Wide Weave Exhibition arrives in Scotland for the first time at New Lanark where it will be shown from 23rd July – 6th August.

World Wide weave exhibition

The 75 textile works have been created and collected to celebrate the 75th Anniversary of the Camphill Movement which began on 1st June 1940. On this date the first small group of pioneers moved into Camphill House by the River Dee at Milltimber near Aberdeen. Camphill communities provide schools and colleges for children and young people living with developmental problems and learning disabilities and communities for adults where everyone can live, learn and work with others in an environment of mutual respect and equality.

The World Wide Weave project has involved hundreds of people all over the Camphill Movement in 19 distinct nations and regions, with contributions created in 61 communities in Scotland, Northern Ireland, England, Wales, Ireland, Netherlands, France, Switzerland, Austria, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Russia, USA, Canada, South Africa, India and Vietnam. The common theme was “Our community’s relationship to its physical and social environment”, but each place was free to develop its own original interpretation. The exhibition also includes a small number of special pieces contributed by individual master weavers and tapestry makers.

Every one of the 75 pieces is unique and has its own story to tell. For example, there is a beautiful felting of the Russian landscape from the Camphill day-centre Turmalin in Moscow, where at first they were not sure they could do anything at all and then completed and delivered a masterpiece in record time. There is an enchanting tapestry of Tapola in Finland, brimful of colour and details of the village and its life, and a similar brilliantly coloured creation from Kyle in Ireland. There is a matching pair of Spring and Autumn feltings from Corbenic in Perthshire, breathtaking in their artistry, colour and detail.

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From Camphill School Aberdeen comes panel number 1 (quite rightly), a tapestry which incorporates a wealth of archetypal Camphill imagery and symbolism in one richly coloured and textured composition. In some pieces, for example from Mountshannon (Ireland), Rotvoll (Norway), Oaklands Park (England) and Loch Arthur (Scotland) it is the actual woven texture which is paramount, as the background to a symphony of colour which constitutes a whole world of experience in itself. From California there are two complementary semi-abstract pieces representing the wide panorama of the ocean and the majestic verticality of the redwood forest.

The World Wide Weave is an artistic endeavour, meant to be appreciated and enjoyed as such, but also it carries with it at least four messages. First of all, it embodies the principle of Unity in Diversity. Despite their huge variation in size, location and task and the incredibly rich mix of people who constantly interweave their lives and destinies in the network of Camphill communities, they all have the same set of core principles at heart. The exhibition expresses all the wonderfully varied and diverse characteristics of single communities coming together in one great artistic panorama of Camphill. Secondly, the exhibition carries a fundamental statement of equality regarding the potential of people with learning disabilities. The weavers, felters, tapestry-makers and embroiderers are artists and artisans in their own right and can place their work alongside that of mainstream artists and craftspeople.

A third element is that different individuals in a group have collaborated on a single piece of art, each contributing what they could towards the finished work. This has been a major feature in the development of the World Wide Weave. It has been a renewed experience of community cooperation and an example of social weaving along with the actual textile work. Many other people have also been involved in those pieces which incorporate other materials such as pottery, metal and wood, bringing together different workshops active in the community. A good example is the brilliant seaside image from Camphill Devon which has a colourful background of multi-textured weaving with felted and beadwork flowers, copper leaves, ceramic butterflies and wooden birds!

And fourth, most of the communities have used entirely home produced and in many cases also recycled materials in the World Wide Weave. A few of the exhibits are composed almost entirely of recycled materials. Caring for our natural resources, recycling and renewal is a special theme that runs throughout the exhibition.

The connection between New Lanark and Camphill goes very deep. The economic model of life in a Camphill community was strongly inspired by the work of Robert Owen and his efforts to establish a humane, just and fair economy in which everyone’s needs could adequately be met. He was seen by the founders of Camphill as a forerunner of their own commitment to the principle of brother/sisterhood in the economic sphere. In fact, Robert Owen is regarded as one of three ‘stars’ of Camphill, pioneering historical figures who laid the foundations for what were later formulated as Camphill essentials in education, social life and economics.

During the past seven months, visitors to the exhibition in England and Wales have been deeply affected by the range and richness of colour in the exhibits and the incredible variety and complexity of techniques on display. Through the texts and photos that accompany the exhibits they experience what they describe as a joyful, uplifting and life-affirming message. Last, but not least, they are deeply impressed by the skill and ability shown by the craftspeople and by the spirit of creative collaboration which is so much a part of that process. As one visitor in Bristol expressed it, “the best thing of all is that it so clearly comes from a living experience of community, and that’s something that we all need nowadays”.

Please come to see this spectacular show in the historic and very appropriate setting of New Lanark World Heritage Site. 23rd July – 6th August 2015, New Lanark Institute. 10am-5pm. Free entry!

You can follow the progress of the tour on the website www.camphillfoundation.net which will have all relevant information about the various venues, and also updates appearing regularly on Facebook/camphill-foundation-uk-ireland and Twitter @camphillFD.

The exhibition will move on to other venues in Scotland, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland and in 2016 to Switzerland, Norway and North America.

Peter Bateson – Development Coordinator and Exhibition Curator

The World Wide Weave Exhibition at New Lanark

The World Wide Weave Exhibition at New Lanark

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16/07/15 CAVLP # , , , , , , ,

Redcoats Launch Mapping the Past Project at Cleghorn Roman Camp

Redcoats Launch Mapping the Past Project at Cleghorn Roman Camp

Guest blog from Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership

An 18th century historic re-enactment survey by local mapping hero William Roy, followed by a local heritage Meet and Greet launched a project exploring the archaeology and heritage of the Clyde and Avon valleys last weekend.

The project, ‘Mapping the Past,’ will be led by CAVLP Heritage and facilitate the exploration of the area’s unique past through map based learning, research, design and making for locals. It is delivered by Northlight Heritage as a partner of the Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP), and supported by Historic Scotland and Renewable Energy Fund managed by South Lanarkshire Council.

Cleghorn Temporary Roman Camp near Lanark was discovered and first surveyed by William Roy in 1764 as part of his comprehensive survey of Roman antiquities of Northern Britain. 225 years after his death, on Friday 10th July, this very survey was re-enacted by the CAVLP Heritage team in full 18th century costume and with authentic survey chain and flag, where they could explore the finer details of 18th century surveying. The survey was preceded by a pilgrimage to the monument of the visionary cartographer’s birthplace at Miltonhead, near Carluke.

A CAVLP Heritage Meet and Greet followed the survey at David Dale’s House in New Lanark the following day. The team introduced visitors to the upcoming workshop streams through a series of activities. They drew maps from the survey data they collected on Friday, one in a traditional style using ink and fountain pens and another in a more creative, crafts based style. The team also ran some small surveys using the 18th century equipment, encouraging visitors to help out and handle the tools.

“It’s great that you’re here telling us about him,” a visitor to New Lanark on July 11th said, “I had heard of William Roy before but I didn’t know he was the father of the Ordnance Survey.”

The two main workshop themes which will run over the summer and autumn, are map-based research workshops and Crafting Maps workshops. The map-based research workshops will introduce participants to using historical maps to explore their heritage and learn about the changing landscape. The Crafting Maps workshops will be focused on creating different kinds of maps so that people can explore their connection to the Clyde and Avon Valleys. The team will also be running and hosting events and activities that will celebrate the rich mapping heritage of the Clyde and Avon Valleys.

“We hope there will be a workshop or event which will allow most people to get involved in some way with CAVLP Heritage.  Please contact the CAVLP Heritage team, whether you are interested in learning more about Major-General William Roy, developing new heritage skills, creating different kinds of maps or volunteering to help research more about the landscape and history of the Clyde and Avon Valleys,” says Gavin MacGregor, a director at Northlight Heritage and Manager of the CAVLP Heritage Programme.

The team encourages anyone who is interested to contact them at [email protected] for further details, or following them on Facebook at CAVLP Heritage or on Twitter @CAVLPHeritage to keep up to date with events and workshops.

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14/07/15 Uncategorized # , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: July 2015

Roof Garden Diary: July 2015

The flat flowerheads  of the Dark-leaved Elder,  Sambucus nigra ‘Guincho Purple’, show  rich raspberry and cream  colours contrasting with its dark foliage.   Beneath it the milky bellfower, Campanula ‘Loddon Anna’, makes a carpet of green leaves punctuated by rounded heads of lovely pale lilac, bell-shaped flowers.  In the stone troughs, the low cushions of bright purple thyme are attracting lots of bees and hoverflies, and a Painted Lady butterfly has been sunning itself on the warm stonework.  Look out for these butterflies this  summer  –  they look pale brown in flight and have black and orange markings when settled.   Meanwhile the tall golden oat grasses  swish gently in the breeze overhead.   Enjoy the beauties of summer in New Lanark Roof Garden this month!

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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New Lanark World Heritage Site Aerial View

New Lanark is a beautifully restored 18th century cotton mill village in Scotland, and is one of Scotland's six UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

On our blog you'll find a behind-the-scenes look at all the latest news, events, stories and general 'goings-on' from New Lanark World Heritage Site.

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