New Lanark World Heritage Site Blog

Roof Garden

01/12/17 Roof Garden # , , , ,

New Lanark Gardens Diary: Winter 2017

New Lanark Gardens Diary: Winter 2017

November / December  2017

The neat beech hedge in front of David Dale’s House glows with copper and gold tones contrasting with the stonework and the blue of the sky in the late November sunshine.   Next door in Robert Owen’s Garden, the apple tree hangs thick with fruit.

Robert Owen was the social pioneer who took over the cotton mills at New Lanark from his father-in-law, David Dale.  Owen then went on to develop his enlightened vision for education and working conditions there.  We know that apple dumpling was one of Robert Owen’s favourite foods and that he asked his housekeeper to make one for him every day!  Meanwhile, down in the gorge below the village, the Clyde churns itself into misty foam. We celebrated St Andrew’s Day by lighting up the Falls and other parts of the village  blue, making them look a lot different than normal!

Remember to book online for our Christmas events, then come and enjoy it all, indoors and outside! Click here to find out more and book tickets.

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

0 likes no responses
07/09/17 Roof Garden # , , , , , , ,

New Lanark Garden Diary: September 2017

New Lanark Garden Diary: September 2017

At the start of August, clusters of bright red berries adorned the rowan trees near the Clearburn Natural Picnic & Play Area.  By the end of the month, however, all that bounty had disappeared down the throats of hungry blackbirds and thrushes enjoying a late summer feast.   In folklore, the rowan was known as the Quicken Tree, and was believed to keep away witches and malevolent spirits, so New Lanark should be well protected!

Who are the mystery night-time visitors who have torn up the grass near the rowan trees?  Badgers! These elusive creatures have been pushing their snouts around under the turf, seeking  earthworms  and grubs during the night.

Meanwhile, over in Robert Owen’s Garden, the clematis ‘Jackmanii’ is putting on a wonderful  late summer show of its large dark blue flowers as it ascends to the top of the golden holly bush.

Come down to New Lanark and enjoy!

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

0 likes no responses
04/08/17 Roof Garden # , , , , , , ,

New Lanark Garden Diary: August 2017

New Lanark Garden Diary: August 2017

After the long dry Spring, the summer weather has been very wet.  The white Buddleia named ‘Peace’ is in full bloom in New Lanark’s War Memorial Garden, but its flowers have been somewhat spoiled by the rain, and the butterflies that usually arrive in abundance at this time of year have not so far appeared.

However, there is one butterfly that has been seen in the Clyde Valley Nature Reserve and in New Lanark Roof Garden where it was spotted drinking nectar from a purple-flowered buddleia.  (See photo.) This lovely butterfly is the Comma, so called because it has a tiny mark shaped like a comma (or small letter C) on its undersides.  The Comma’s story is one of remarkable  survival and  adaptation.

Comma caterpillars used to feed on hops and the butterfly was plentiful in Kent and the hop-growing areas of south east England.  However, when the industry went into decline, the butterfly’s population dropped severely.  In the past few years, however, it has staged an amazing recovery after the caterpillars adapted to eating the leaves of stinging nettles instead of hops.  As nettles grow nearly everywhere, the butterfly is now expanding its range right to the north of Scotland!  Global warming may also be having an effect on its expansion.   Visit New Lanark and see if you can spot this wonderful  butterfly!

Click here to find out more about visiting New Lanark and What’s On…

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

0 likes no responses
05/07/17 Roof Garden # , , , , , , , ,

New Lanark Garden Diary: Summer 2017

New Lanark Garden Diary: Summer 2017

June and July 2017

As the longest day passes, the summer begins.  In New Lanark Roof Garden, the combination of curry plant, and lavender with the dark pink of the tall penstemons, creates the appearance of a soft summer meadow in miniature. The yellow flag irises at the back of the garden didn’t do too well this year as the spring was warm and very dry, and they like moist soil.   At ground level, the area  between the Hotel and the first bridge over the lade is the lade overflow.  It is a full working part of New Lanark’s power generation system but has become an ecological niche in its own right.  Look out for the lovely flowing green stems and white flowers of the water crowfoot.  This amazing plant is adapted to live under the water with the flowers emerging on the surface.

Water crowfoot in the Mill Lade

Also look for the purple spires of watermint and frothy white heads of meadowsweet.  Later in July, little yellow monkey flowers will appear with them.  Robins, dippers and wagtails, also enjoy this environment with its flowing water and plenty of places at the side to perch.

Click here to find out more about visiting New Lanark and our current summer exhibition, Brick City!

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

0 likes no responses
19/05/17 Roof Garden # , , ,

New Lanark Garden Diary: May 2017

New Lanark Garden Diary: May 2017

May is a lovely time at New Lanark.  Earlier in the month the apple tree in Robert Owen’s Garden was covered in white blossom, and around  the village the sprouting green foliage contrasts with the stone of the 200-year-old mill buildings.

The Apple Tree in Robert Owen’s Garden

The mavis or song-thrush pours out its song over the valley.  Mavis derives its name from May and avis, the Latin word for bird.   The spell of long, dry weather had left the River Clyde very low, exposing  its flat gray rocks,  but with the recent return of the rain, the river is just covering them again.

Where have the Falls gone?!

 

In New Lanark Roof Garden, as in previous years, a mother duck and her chicks had to be rescued by rangers from the Scottish Wildlife Trust after the chicks hatched out in the roof garden and were trapped there!

Last year’s duck family on the go

 

Find out more about visiting New Lanark this spring. 

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

0 likes no responses
11/04/17 Roof Garden # , , , , , ,

New Lanark Gardens Diary – April 2017

New Lanark Gardens Diary – April 2017

This month lovely wood anemones carpet the floor of New Lanark’s woodland with a flush of starry white flowers.  You can see these precious wild flowers, also known as Lady’s Nightcap, beside the Clearburn Natural Outdoor Play Area next to the Clyde Valley Nature Reserve at New Lanark.  According to the charity Plantlife, wood anemones are a well-known indicator of ancient woodland as they spread very slowly from rootstocks rather than seeds.  On the grassy bank below Caithness Row,  the  daffodils are giving a brilliant display just now.  It won’t last, so come along soon and enjoy the fresh air and flowers!

You can find out more about visiting New Lanark at www.newlanark.org 

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

 

0 likes no responses
08/03/17 Roof Garden # , , , , , ,

New Lanark Gardens Diary – March 2017

New Lanark Gardens Diary – March 2017

Signs of Spring are everywhere around at New Lanark now.  A few snowdrops have braved the cold to flower by the path along the Mill Lade, and the first bright yellow daffodils are in bloom in the Roof Garden.  The River Clyde has been running high, creating magnificent waterfalls at Cora Linn and Bonnington Linn further upstream.  The weather may be improving but it is deceptive.  Be prepared for ‘The Teuchit Storm’, an old name for a spell of wet and windy weather that was once thought to occur in late March about the time that the ‘teuchit’ or lapwing starts nesting in the fields upriver!

You can enjoy an early Spring visit to New Lanark with Buy One Get One Free on tickets until the end of March 2017. Click here to download your voucher!

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

Snowdrops on the New Lanark Roof Garden

0 likes no responses
07/02/17 Roof Garden # , , , ,

New Lanark Gardens Diary – February 2017

New Lanark Gardens Diary – February 2017

New Lanark Gardens Diary – February 2017

February light glows on the stonework of the houses at New Lanark as seen from the path into the Clyde Valley Nature Reserve.   The island in the middle of the river is called Mid Inch on which a tall evergreen Scots pine tree has found a foothold.  The stones at the water’s edge are the haunt of a heron.  Nearby in the village is New Lanark’s Clearburn Natural Outdoor Play & Picnic Area.  There are squirrels hiding under the ivy covering the old trees and a pair of tiny wrens have been spotted flying in and out of the lade tunnel.  (The scientific name for a wren is ‘troglodytes’ meaning ‘cave dweller’!)  Playing outdoors is now recognised as essential for children’s cognitive and emotional development, so bring the kids along and see what else you can spot (entry to the Clearburn Play Area is free). If the weather isn’t great there’s always the indoor Interactive Gallery! 

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

Here are some more photos of the village in early February…

0 likes no responses
05/01/17 Roof Garden # , , , ,

New Lanark Gardens Diary: January 2017

New Lanark Gardens Diary: January 2017

Welcome to the first New Lanark Gardens Diary of 2017!

Up until about 100 years ago in Scotland, the first Monday in the new year was known as Handsel Monday and this was the day on which people exchanged presents. The First Statistical Account tells us that it was a day ‘for recreation and merry-making’.   The word ‘handsel’ meant to put a gift in someone’s hand and could also mean to inaugurate or start something new.  The first photo for New Lanark Gardens Diary 2017 shows  the houses at Caithness Row in low-angled sunlight with birch trees in the foreground  and a crisp frost on the grass. Very best wishes for 2017 to all our readers, guests and visitors!

2017 also happens to be Visit Scotland’s Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology. You can find out more about how you can be involved in this exciting year at New Lanark by visiting our website.

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

 

0 likes no responses
08/12/16 Roof Garden # , , , , ,

New Lanark Garden Diary: December 2016

New Lanark Garden Diary: December 2016

In our monthly Garden Diary Liz lets us know what’s happening in the world of nature at New Lanark…

Winter has begun bringing with it some frosty spells.  These transformed the trees across the Clyde at New Lanark into a sparkling Christmas card scene with curtains of icicles hanging from the rocks.

The bare branches of the trees made a delicate white tracery against the background of darker evergreens further up the bank.   This was the perfect setting for the start of New Lanark’s Christmas at the Mills event – tickets are still available for the weekends and 23 and 24 December by booking online at www.newlanark.org.   Come and have some fun following the Rudolph Trail!  See if you can find his little wooden house and discover what he likes to do there!

Here are some more photos from our frosty spell at New Lanark…

Winter woods at New Lanark

Frosty grass at New Lanark

Frozen leaves at New Lanark

Winter Falls of Clyde at New Lanark

Winter river at New Lanark

Winter in Robert Owen's Garden at New Lanark

The Bell Tower at New Lanark

Frozen ice crystals at New Lanark

Find out more about visiting New Lanark this Christmas!

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

0 likes no responses
1 2 3 4 5

New Lanark World Heritage Site Aerial View

New Lanark is a beautifully restored 18th century cotton mill village in Scotland, and is one of Scotland's six UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

On our blog you'll find a behind-the-scenes look at all the latest news, events, stories and general 'goings-on' from New Lanark World Heritage Site.

We are always looking for guest bloggers to become involved with the blog. If you are interested in writing for us, please get in touch.

Join us online


Join our mailing list