New Lanark World Heritage Site Blog

Roof Garden

04/02/15 New Lanark World Heritage Site , Roof Garden # , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: February 2015

New Lanark Roof Garden February 2015

Roof Garden Diary: February 2015

Winter arrived in earnest in mid-January and a coating of frozen snow still lingers over New Lanark Roof Garden.  Even the stalwart heather ‘Silver Knight’ and the grasses have been flattened by the blanket of white.  The snowdrops, normally in bloom by February, are hardly showing.  Yet the days are slowly lengthening towards Spring.   In the photograph, the Braxfield Row houses are caught by the gold light of the February sun.

Enjoy the Roof Garden as part of the New Lanark Visitor Centre. 

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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14/01/15 Roof Garden

Roof Garden Diary: January 2015

In New Lanark Roof Garden this month, a few small spikes of bulbs are slowly inching up through the soil. The seed heads of the purple anemones (near the lift) are like little speckled buttons that keep their shape for a long time and look attractive with a dusting of frost or snow. On the village side of the Roof Garden, you are at eye level with the top of a tall Scots pine tree showing off its green needles in spite of the wind, rain and snow!

Scots pine from the New lanark Roof Garden

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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03/12/14 Roof Garden # , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: December 2014

Roof Garden Diary: December 2014

The autumn has been mild with the first frosts arriving only at the start of December. By this time in 2012, the fountain was frozen over and New Lanark Roof Garden coated in white frost. This year, however, the little reindeer are still able to nibble the grass and drink from the flowing fountain!

The darker nights bring stars, so keep an eye on our website towards the end of the year for details of our Stargazing Live event on Saturday 21st and Sunday 22nd March 2015. December is a good month to see meteor showers wherever you are. The Geminid shower is due on 13-14th December and is expected to peak at 120 meteors per hour. Look out also for the Ursid shower around 22 and 23 December. A good time to look is just after dusk.

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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04/11/14 Roof Garden # , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: October / November 2014

Roof Garden Diary: October / November 2014

The fresh white Japanese anemones are the last of this year’s flowers in New Lanark Roof Garden.  They have looked stunning  against the backdrop of the autumn trees above the village.   Signs of the season are all around.  A robin sings from a nearby Scots Pine tree, and overhead huge skeins of geese have been seen gliding in V-shaped formation high up over New Lanark  on their way to warmer places. There’s lots to enjoy before the winter sets in!

Hornbeam and trees

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

 

 

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05/12/12 Roof Garden # , ,

Resident Robin Roof Garden Diary: December 2012

Resident Robin Roof Garden Diary: December 2012

Cheep …  cheep … chirrup …   I’m the New Lanark Roof Garden robin!   I bet you didn’t know that reindeer could fly?  There I was, perched on a bare twig, with my feathers puffed out to keep myself warm.  Jack Frost had already tiptoed across the Roof Garden and worked his magic on the fountain, changing the water into rock.  Then, imagine my surprise when five tiny reindeer, made of sparkling light, came floating down from the sky and landed on the grass nearby!  They said they were very tired as they had flown all the way from the North Pole. The Man Who Looks After the Reindeer will be at New Lanark every weekend and on Monday 24 December so you can visit him.  Hey!  Please put out some crumbs and fresh water for me and my friends this winter.  I know you’ll be stuffing YOUR faces …   Happy Christmas!

Click here for more information about our Christmas experience. 

Watch our Christmas Experience advert – on your televisions right now!

Christmas at New Lanark Ad

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07/09/12 Roof Garden # ,

Roof Garden Diary September 2012

Summer is gradually slinking away but a whole new set of flowers has appeared at the start of autumn in New Lanark Roof Garden.  Purple anemones are coming out, and there are beautiful Japanese anemones with clear white petals and orange centres.  Dazzling yellow stars of coreopsis glow beneath the owl sculpture.  The button-shaped flower heads of lavender cotton (Santolina) are fading fast, and smell like sweaty socks! On the other side of the garden, scores of hoverflies are attracted to the pale mauve spikes of heather ‘Silver Knight’. The swallows are still around but will soon be leaving for warmer climes as the temperature drops.

In flower in September – purple anemone, Japanese anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’, Russian sage‘ Blue Spire’, coreopsis verticillata, heather (Calluna) ‘Silver Knight’, penstemon ‘Amelia Jane’, liatris spicata, rudbeckia ‘Herbstonne’, buddleia davidii ‘Harlequin’.

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14/08/12 Roof Garden #

Roof Garden Diary – August 2012

The weather may have improved, but this August  we have no flowering yucca and no butterflies in New Lanark Roof Garden!  However, the lavender has braved the rain and the lovely bell-shaped flowers of penstemons add a touch of crimson.  Meadowsweet, which also grows wild in watery meadows, has tall scented heads of fluffy white flowers, and the flowerheads of santolina shine out like yellow buttons.  All these plants are attractive to the bees and hoverflies that appear whenever the weather is fine.   The swallows are still around.  Down below in the mill lade, small yellow monkey flowers are growing wild along with water mint and marsh forget-me-nots. The water-loving plants have had a great summer! 

In flower this month  – Lavender, penstemon ‘Amelia Jane’, meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria), lavender cotton (Santolina chamaecyparissus), Philadelphus coronarius ‘Aureus’, clematis, Himalayan honeysuckle and various grasses.

 

 

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01/08/12 Roof Garden # , ,

Roof Garden Diary – July 2012

Either it has been raining heavily or a gentle misty smirr has enveloped New Lanark Roof Garden. In the constant wet conditions, the flowers have struggled, but the old cottage garden favourites have done best. In the troughs there are bright purple cushions of thyme beside spikes of blue lavender. The lovely pale pink rose ‘Penelope’ is covered in flowers with more buds to come and tall spires of foxgloves and meadow rue give soft colour and height to the garden. Even in the rain, the honeysuckle twining around the wooden owl’s plinth is sweet-scented. Also known as woodbine, honeysuckle appears in Shakespeare’s magical play, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” where it forms a canopy over the sleeping Fairy Queen! So bring your umbrella and enjoy!
Click here for details of summer events. In flower : thyme, lavender, sage, astrantia, honeysuckle, lychnis coronaria ‘Alba’, penstemon ‘Amelia Jane’, hebe ‘Midsummer Beauty’, rosa ‘Penelope’.

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18/06/12 New Lanark Visitor Centre , Roof Garden # ,

Roof Garden diary update – June 2012

Alium in the Roof Garden

Alium in the Roof Garden

June 2012 – The big purple spheres of the allium heads look stunning now, even when beaded with raindrops! They attract bees whenever the temperature rises. Chocolate-coloured leaves and tiny pink flowers adorn the black elderberry (Sambucus nigra) ‘Guincho Purple’. The flowers have red stems and are borne in flattened heads called cymes. Contrasting with these purples and pinks are the showy yellow blooms of flag iris (Iris pseudacorus) and the lemon foliage of the sedge, Carex flagellifera. Honeysuckle twines around the owl sculpture, the flowers just opening to perfume the cool evening air.
In flower in June – allium, chives, thyme, honeysuckle, black elder ‘Guincho Purple’, yellow flag iris, Deutzia, weeping brown sedge (Carex flagellifera), giant feather grass (Stipa gigantea).

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23/05/12 Events at New Lanark , New Lanark Visitor Centre , New Lanark World Heritage Site , Roof Garden # , , ,

Roof Garden diary update – May 2012

Blushing tulip close up on Roof Garden

Blushing tulip close up on Roof Garden

“In May the pleasant spray upsprings / In May the mirthful mavis sings”. These rhythmic lines from Alexander Scott’s joyful poem about May were written in Edinburgh in the 16th century, but could be describing New Lanark Roof Garden today! The hornbeam hedges are sporting fresh green leaves, the elder blossom is coming out, the woolly willow is covered in furry catkins and the tulips are blooming. From the surrounding countryside arise the notes of the mavis (song thrush) and other birdsong. The swallows are back, swooping low to catch insects in the valley. Also remember – our Midsummer on the Roof Garden Event takes place next month – visit www.newlanark.org for details.

In flower in May: Kerria Japonica, tulips ‘Spring Green’ and ‘Blushing Bride’, elder, winter creeper (Euonymus) ‘Emerald Gaiety’, woolly willow (Salix lanata).

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New Lanark World Heritage Site Aerial View

New Lanark is a beautifully restored 18th century cotton mill village in Scotland, and is one of Scotland's six UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

On our blog you'll find a behind-the-scenes look at all the latest news, events, stories and general 'goings-on' from New Lanark World Heritage Site.

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