New Lanark World Heritage Site Blog

CAVLP

25/01/17 CAVLP # , , , ,

Frame the landscape with CAVLP Heritage

Frame the landscape with CAVLP Heritage

Guest post from Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership

The Clyde and Avon Valley has long been a destination for visitors, including esteemed artists and writers such as J. M. W. Turner, the Wordsworths and Sir Walter Scott.

Known for its patchwork of nationally important woodlands and stunning geological formations, crumbling castles and orchard heritage, the area has fired the imagination of visitors throughout the ages.

CAVLP Heritage are now offering a unique way to explore the landscape through the eyes of artists, writers, photographers and film-makers by way of a series of six FREE Framing the Landscape walks where paintings, photos, films and literature will be used to see the landscape in new ways.

Taking place every Saturday at 2pm, from 11 February up to and including 19 March, the walks will offer a tantalizing look at figures that have been inspired by the landscape or have made an impact on it in some way. Think Sir Walter Scott and Craignethan Castle, J. M. W. Turner at the Falls of Clyde and even Scott’s Jam Works at Carluke.

These events will form part of a larger project called Local Landscape Heroes which is focusing on the people who historically changed and maintained the character of the historic environment and landscape and those that have been inspired by it.

People of all ages and backgrounds are invited to take part in this programme of exploratory walks throughout the Clyde and Avon Valley.  The events will be led by experienced archaeologists from CAVLP Heritage who will be on hand to offer expert insight into areas at Chatelherault, Lanark, Wishaw, Craignethan Castle, Falls of Clyde and New Lanark, and Carluke.

There are 6 different walks to choose from. Each takes around two hours and is FREE although booking is essential at www.cavlp.eventbrite.co.uk. Participants are encouraged to attend as many as they like.

Saturday 11 February: Inspired by the Oaks – Scenery Stroll at Chatelherault: Join the team at Chatelherault to explore artwork inspired by the Avon Water and Cadzow Oaks.  Learn about the painters including Alexander Fraser and Simon Bough, who were inspired by the natural beauty of the Avon Valley landscape.

Saturday 18 February: Country Makers – Worthy Wander in Lanark: Explore the historical figures who helped to shape the town of Lanark through its early days, including William Wallace, David I, William the Lion and Robert Forrest. Visit sites of local importance to Lanark and explore the artistic representations of the deeds of past country-makers.

Saturday 25 February: Wishaw on Film – Snapshot Saunter in Wishaw: Explore how Wishaw has been represented on film and visit some of the sites featured in old photographs and films. Learn about the lives of local photographers and filmmakers such as Charles Reid and Enrico Cocozza, and how they were inspired by their local landscape.

Saturday 4 March: Inspired by the Castle: Poetic Promenade at Craignethan: Join us on a journey from the Clyde Valley up to Craignethan Castle and enjoy the literature of local and visiting writers such as Sir Walter Scott and Janet Hamilton, who were inspired by the landscape and the castle.

Saturday 11 March: Inspired by the Falls – Representation Ramble at New Lanark: Take a look at the art and literature inspired by the Falls of Clyde and New Lanark, and learn about ­the artists such as Samuel Taylor Coleridge and J. M. W. Turner who created it.

Saturday 18 March: Strawberry Fields – Jelly Jaunt in Carluke: Celebrate the achievements of the Scott brothers in starting the strawberry growing industry in the Clyde and Avon Valley, and the long heritage of preserve making that continues today. Take a look at old photographs that help to tell their story and the story of fruit growing in the Carluke area.

Karen McCusker, CAVLP Heritage Project Assistant, says: “This is a great opportunity to get to know a little bit more about the local people who have shaped the Clyde and Avon Valley that we know and love today, in a fun and unexpected way.”

The walks are part of the Local Landscape Heroes project which celebrates the people that have shaped and been inspired the Clyde and Avon Valley, from farmers to millers and poets to painters. The project is managed by Northlight Heritage with funding from Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership and Historic Environment Scotland.

Volunteers can also join CAVLP Heritage in researching Local Landscape Heroes of the Clyde and Avon Valley in Hamilton Town House Archives every Thursday up to and including 30 March, between 11am – 7pm.

If you would like to get involved, or would love to know more, please get in touch with CAVLP Heritage at [email protected] or 01555 661 555. Booking is necessary in order to take part and can be done through e-mail.

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22/09/16 CAVLP # , , ,

Sue Palmer puts Natural Play on top of the agenda in Lanarkshire

Sue Palmer puts Natural Play on top of the agenda in Lanarkshire

Lanarkshire’s first ever Natural Play conference is taking place in Hamilton this November.  The event has seen unprecedented demand for places since bookings opened last week, reflecting the huge appetite locally for natural play initiatives.

Sue Palmer, author of Toxic Childhood (Orion 2006), will act as keynote speaker for the FREE conference taking place at Hamilton Park Racecourse, which is open to anyone interested in why, where and how children can play outdoors.

Organised in collaboration with South Lanarkshire Countryside Rangers and supported by the William Grant Foundation and Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP), attendees will be able to find out what activities have been developed locally, as well as join skill-focussed talks and workshops which can be  booked on the day. Workshops will cover a range of topics including loose-parts play, safe campfires, woodland art and much more.

Karen Dobbins, Development Officer for CAVLP Natural Play focussed projects said: “Whether you are a parent, work with children in schools or nurseries, are a child-minder or a play-worker, the conference will offer a valuable opportunity to network and share ideas.”

She continues: “This conference is just a part of the Natural Play initiatives that CAVLP has been involved in establishing locally. Triple award-winning Natural Play and Picnic Area was created at New Lanark in 2014, we’ve had two jam-packed summers of play activities with newly established OutLET: Play Resource and 16 people have received training in Forest Schools.”

As part of the package, schools in and around the Clyde and Avon Valley can also access teacher training to support outdoor learning on local sites. In partnership with Grounds for Learning, CAVLP are offering FREE places on Teaching in Nature, an accredited course to support teachers in their professional development. The course begins on 24 October 2016 at RSPB Scotland Baron’s Haugh, Motherwell and consists of three practical training days spread out over a year. Local schools can book the last remaining spaces by emailing [email protected] or calling 01555 663 430.

Lanarkshire based Growing Up Wild Natural Play initiative is just one in a number of national and international initiatives, which recognise and attempt to redress the disconnect between children and nature in contemporary society. A number of reports highlight this growing disaffection, including Natural Childhood, by Stephen Moss (National Trust, 2012), which reveals that fewer than 1 in 10 children regularly play in wild places.

Acting as keynote speaker for the conference, former head teacher and campaigner for literacy, Sue Palmer, is an advocate for the issues surrounding the effects of contemporary childhood on development and learning. Her books, Toxic Childhood, Detoxing Childhood (2007) and 21st Century Boys (2009), led to her involvement in many campaigns related to modern childhood and she is currently a Board Member of Play Scotland.

“We are honoured to have Sue Palmer as keynote speaker for the conference,” says Susan McNeish, South Lanarkshire Countryside Rangers.

She continues, “We’ve found that there’s been a growing appetite for Natural Play initiatives locally and it’s great to have someone like Sue along who helps connect these local activities to the wider, national conversation. We’d urge any interested parties in coming along to sign up.”

Book your FREE ticket or find out more at www.cavlp.eventbrite.co.uk, or by contacting the CAVLP Team on 01555 663 430, or emailing [email protected].

Watch the promotional video by searching for ‘Growing Up Wild! Lanarkshire’s First Natural Play Conference’ on www.youtube.com.

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12/09/16 CAVLP # , , , , ,

Mapping the Past exhibition

Mapping the Past exhibition

This morning we went to see the newly opened ‘Mapping the Past’ exhibition at Lanark Library. The exhibition and guide explores the unique cartographic heritage of the Clyde and Avon Valley and a 2000 year history of mapping in Scotland, including connections to the Father of Modern Mapping, Carluke born Major-General William Roy and local sites of interest, such as the area’s trig pillars.

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The Mapping the Past exhibition and guide launch corresponds with the 80th birthday celebrations of the Trig Pillar this year. The first trig pillar was built by the Ordnance Survey in 1936. These pillars aided in the triangulation of Britain, which was vitally important to the creation of accurate maps of the country.  Around 6500 of these Trig Pillars were constructed, and from 1936 to 1962, OS surveyors gathered measurements to create a highly accurate map of Britain. Approximately 6000 of these still remain – two of which are in the Clyde and Avon Valley area at Black Hill and Milton Head.

The exhibition runs from Monday 12 – Friday 30 September at Lanark Library. It will be open Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 9:15am – 5pm, Tuesday 9:15 – 8pm, Friday 10am – 5pm and Saturday 9:15 – 5pm. The exhibition will be closed on Sundays.

To find out more about CAVLP Heritage projects and how you can get involved, visit www.clydeandavonvalley.org. You can contact the team at [email protected] or on 01555 663 430. Follow them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/CAVLPHeritage or on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/CAVLPHeritage to keep up to date with events and workshops.

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19/08/16 CAVLP # , , , ,

Lanark Library to host Mapping the Past Exhibition and Guide Launch

Lanark Library to host Mapping the Past Exhibition and Guide Launch

Members of the public are invited to attend the FREE Mapping the Past pop-up exhibition and guide launch will take place on Monday 12 September, at Lanark Library.

The exhibition and guide explores the unique cartographic heritage of the Clyde and Avon Valley and a 2000 year history of mapping in Scotland, including connections to the Father of Modern Mapping, Carluke born Major-General William Roy and local sites of interest, such as the area’s trig pillars.

The exhibition, first displayed in Carluke earlier in the year, also showcases artwork created by local community groups, schools and Guide and Scout groups as part of the Mapping the Past Project. The project was undertaken by CAVLP Heritage, managed by Northlight Heritage and supported by Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP) and Historic Environment Scotland.

“The creative maps are a wonderful addition to the more traditional elements of the exhibition,” explains Karen McCusker, CAVLP Heritage Project Officer. “We started the workshops by exploring the legacy of mapping survey techniques and the first Ordnance Survey maps that Major-General William Roy produced, before creating personalised and expressive maps based in the Clyde and Avon Valley.”

Visitors to the exhibition are encouraged to take home copies of the Mapping the Past Guide, which offers details about the mapping heritage of the Clyde and Avon Valley. The guide will be available as a digital trail from www.clydeandavonvalley.org/trails from September 12 onward.

“The guide includes three trails and is a great way for all to get out and explore the mapping heritage of the Clyde and Avon Valley,” says Gavin McGregor, Project Manager at Northlight Heritage. “It takes you on journeys between trig pillars, historic sites and even includes Alasdair Gray’s fantastic 1969 ‘Falls of Clyde’ mural at the Kirkfieldbank Tavern.”

The Mapping the Past exhibition and guide launch corresponds with the 80th birthday celebrations of the Trig Pillar this year. The first trig pillar was built by the Ordnance Survey in 1936. These pillars aided in the triangulation of Britain, which was vitally important to the creation of accurate maps of the country.  Around 6500 of these Trig Pillars were constructed, and from 1936 to 1962, OS surveyors gathered measurements to create a highly accurate map of Britain. Approximately 6000 of these still remain – two of which are in the Clyde and Avon Valley area at Black Hill and Milton Head.

The exhibition runs from Monday 12 – Friday 30 September at Lanark Library. It will be open Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 9:15am – 5pm, Tuesday 9:15 – 8pm, Friday 10am – 5pm and Saturday 9:15 – 5pm. The exhibition will be closed on Sundays.

The exhibition precedes the launch of the Local Landscape Heroes CAVLP Heritage project later in September. This volunteer led project will celebrate the artists, writers, designers, architects and ordinary people of the Clyde and Avon valley who shaped the landscape and cultural heritage that defines the area as we know it today.

To find out more about CAVLP Heritage projects and how you can get involved, visit www.clydeandavonvalley.org. You can contact the team at [email protected] or on 01555 663 430. Follow them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/CAVLPHeritage or on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/CAVLPHeritage to keep up to date with events and workshops.

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31/05/16 CAVLP # , , , , ,

Future of Chatelherault lies in its past

Future of Chatelherault lies in its past

Guest blog from the Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership…

A MASSIVE woodland management project is underway at Chatelherault Country Park.

Almost 20 hectares of non-native plantation conifers will be removed and native woodland regenerated, as well as the restoration of spectacular historical views and features.

The park, which is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), will remain open at all times during the work, although access from the western side will be disrupted from this month (May) until late September this year.

This work is being funded by South Lanarkshire Council and Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP).

Detailed Forest and Conservation Management Plans are in place to guide the process with the trees removed from the west side of the gorge between the Cadzow oaks and the White Bridge. These were informed by two public consultations that took place last March.

Profits made from the sale of felled timber will be channelled back into much needed improvements to the parks footpath system. This will include replacing the White Bridge and restoring the paths linking to it.

Large machinery will be felling and moving timber throughout summer months and all visitors are asked to avoid the forestry operations for their own safety.

Signs will be placed at the affected paths and in the car parks and further information will be available in the visitor centre. Any areas where work is taking placed will be closed off to the public and clearly signed.

Chair of South Lanarkshire Council’s Community Services Committee, Councillor Hamish Stewart, said: “This work is absolutely essential to allow us to manage the woodland which makes up the spectacular setting that is Chatelherault Country Park.

“The park will of course remain open, the only difference will be some paths may not be accessible while the work is ongoing. Visitors should check the signage or go to the visitor area for more information.

“The tree felling will leave the area in question looking very sparse for the first couple of years, but we know from experience the native tree regeneration is very rapid in Chatelherault’s fertile woodland soils.

“In 2007 we felled a similar area of spruce and fir at Laverock Hill by Barncluith. After only four years the whole area was covered with young trees and after only six years the young woodland was alive with spring birdsong.

“We would ask visitors to be patient with us and understand that this work is essential to the restoration of this beautiful and historic landscape.”

CAVLP programme manager Donna Marshall said: “The regeneration of ancient woodland, which forms part of the Clyde Valley National Nature Reserve, will help reinforce the status of this part of woodland as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI).

“The project at Chatelherault is one in a growing number of rewilding projects in the UK which look at expanding native habitats, increasing biodiversity and connecting communities with the nature on their doorsteps.”

The 5th Duke of Hamilton’s hunting lodge at Chatelherault was restored 27 years ago. Once a crumbling ruin, surrounded by an abandoned sand quarry, William Adam’s 18th century masterpiece is now visited by 250,000 people each year.

From the 1940s through to the late 1960’s the ancient natural woodland at Chatelherault was felled and much of the area was planted with fast growing conifers, hence the need for the woodland regeneration programme.

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26/01/16 CAVLP # , , , , , ,

Kirkyard Tales: The Butcher, The Baker, The Candlestick Maker

Kirkyard Tales: The Butcher, The Baker, The Candlestick Maker

Guest post from Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership

Help exhume secrets of souls laid to rest at St Ninian’s Kirkyard, Stonehouse, by volunteering to take part in a FREE archaeological project on Saturday 6 and Sunday 7 February.

Join CAVLP Heritage and Stonehouse Heritage Group to help shed light on the lives and work of 17th and 18th century bakers, millers, masons, weavers, blacksmiths, farmers and their families, by recording the tools of the trades depicted on the headstones.

No experience of archaeology is necessary – FREE training will be provided in using the latest 3D recording techniques to digitise the gravestones, and there will be activities for all ages and abilities.

“These type of stones were popular in the 17th and 18th century across the whole of Scotland, and they allow us to construct a picture of the people that were living and working around Stonehouse at this time,” explains CAVLP Heritage Officer Dr Paul Murtagh.

He continues, “It would be great if people could help us record these stones so that we can explore the industrial, horticultural and agricultural heritage of the area.”

John Young of the Stonehouse Heritage Group has been recording St Ninian’s Kirkyard for years. He explains that, “As a community we need to work together to preserve our ancestral history in teaching new generations to respect and take pride in preserving our village’s heritage.”

He continues, “One way we can do this is by promoting the importance of graveyards to local residents – helping them understand their historical context, as well as the significance of the carvings etched on the headstones. These records in stone provide us with an insight into the period in which they were erected and stand as monuments to the people who shaped the communities in which we live today.”

The initiative is part of a wider project, Capturing the Past, which is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP) and Historic Scotland, and managed by Northlight Heritage. The project seeks to research and record a variety of local sites of archaeological interest, so there are a plethora of opportunities to get involved in numerous sites of archaeological interest throughout the Clyde and Avon valleys.

A series of FREE, hands-on learning opportunities relating to the historical working lives of people in the Clyde and Avon valleys are also available from the CAVLP Heritage team and run concurrently with the Capturing the Past project until August. MapCRAFT, Tasting Through Time, Sheep to Shawl and Brick by Brick courses explore the mapping, agricultural, horticultural and industrial heritage unique to the area. Designed to fit in with the Curriculum for Excellence, Duke of Edinburgh and John Muir Awards as well as Badge Activities for Guides, Scout and the Boys and Girls Brigade, courses can be tailored to meet the needs of any age group and ability and can last between 2 to 4 hours.

The FREE weekend event at St Ninian’s Kirkyard, Stonehouse, will offer volunteers a chance to engage in the latest techniques used by archaeologists to digitally record sites, and to help enhance the record of this important historical kirkyard. Further events and training weekends will take place on the first and third weekends in February, March and April.

Saturday 6 and Sunday 7 of February – Archaeological survey of St Ninian’s Kirkyard

St Ninians Kirkyard and Stonehouse Lifestyles, 10.30am – 3.30pm, adults, children and families all welcome. Free but booking essential. For more information and to book, call 1555 661555 or email Paul and Karen at [email protected].

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03/12/15 CAVLP # , , , , ,

Winners revealed for autumn round of Clyde and Avon valleys photography competition

Winners revealed for autumn round of Clyde and Avon valleys photography competition

Guest blog from Sarah at the Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership…

Four entries showcasing the autumnal beauty of the local landscape have been selected as winners of the Clyde and Avon valleys’ seasonal photo competition – as the hunt for winter winners begins.

Autumnal views over Chatelherault’s formal garden, Lanark from Black Hill cairn, woodlands at Corra Castle and rooftops at New Lanark by Alan Collison, Dylan Nardini and Ricky Mitchell, were the four winning images selected out of over 40 entries.

The images were picked by the Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP) team with the assistance of Crawford based Mark Archibald Photography Ltd.

“We were overwhelmed by the quality of all of the autumn entries,” says Sarah O’Sullivan, Communications Officer for CAVLP. “Their diversity highlights what a unique landscape the Clyde and Avon valleys are and just why the area is designated an Area of Great Landscape Value. We look forward to the next winter round of the photography competition and seeing the valleys in the subsequent phase of their seasonal journey.”

Winter entries to the competition can now be submitted under the themes of woodlands, built heritage, geology, play, and inspired by the landscape, until 29 February.

Each winning photographer wins a framed print of their photograph and submitted images may be selected for display in Clyde and Avon valleys exhibitions, postcards and digital interpretation of the area on the CAVLP website, alongside credit to the original photographer.

Judging takes place quarterly, after each seasonal category closes. Winter entries close 29 February 2016, with spring and summer entries closing 31 May and 31 August. Overall winners will be picked in September 2016.

Photographs should be taken in, or looking into, the Area of Great Landscape Value which follows the Clyde and Avon valleys from just south of Hamilton to New Lanark and Strathaven respectively. A map outlining the boundary is available in the competition guidelines. The area is well known for attractions such as Chatelherault Country Park and New Lanark World Heritage Site but there are many, more hidden features of the landscape that tell an equally important part of the area’s story.

Open to all ages and photographic abilities, entries are judged on creativity and individuality as much as technical skill.

“Photographs that showcase the best of the Clyde and Avon valleys play an important role in CAVLP’s aim to inspire people to explore the beautiful and often hidden landscape,” says Donna Marshall, Manager of CAVLP.  “Now, more than ever, we are realising how important landscape is to our wellbeing.  A photograph is a very powerful way to convey the beauty, drama and joy to be had from our special local landscape and we hope that photographers will help us raise the profile of the landscape’s unique characteristics.”

Photographs can be entered in a digital format to [email protected] or in print format to: David Dale’s House, Rosedale Street, New Lanark, ML11 9DJ.

To see all of the Autumn entries, please visit the gallery on the CAVLP Facebook page, www.facebook.com/ClydeandAvonValleyLandscapePartnership

For full information on the competition, visit www.clydeandavonvalley.com/news or email [email protected].

Alan Collison Henderson Horticulture (3) - sm

Alan Collison, Horticulture

Dylan Nardini Autumn Designs in Landscapes Lanark from Black Hill cairn

Dylan Nardini, Lanark from Black Hill Cairn

Dylan Nardini Autumn Woodlands - Corra Castle, Falls of Clyde

Dylan Nardini, Corra Castle, Falls of Clyde

Ricky Mitchell Autumn 1 Industrial Heritage sm

Ricky Mitchell, New Lanark

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24/09/15 CAVLP # , , , , ,

Celebrate 100 Years of Orchard History in a Bottle at Fruit Day

Celebrate 100 Years of Orchard History in a Bottle at Fruit Day

Celebrate the Clyde Valley orchards and local produce for free at the 6th annual Fruit Day on Saturday 3 October at Overton Farm, Crossford between 9am and 1.30pm.

Enjoy fresh local produce from Lanarkshire Farmers’ Market alongside the local food demo tent, live music, food and craft stalls, woodturning, a variety of children’s activities and an orchard themed Scarecrow Competition.

This year’s Fruit Day will also see the launch of Clyde Valley Apple Juice – grown, processed and bottled locally by the newly formed Clyde Valley Orchards Cooperative Ltd. Once again local apple juice is being produced for sale drawing on a long tradition of fruit growing and market gardening in the Clyde Valley, once known as the Fruit Basket of Scotland. Demonstration pressings will be taking place throughout the day, letting visitors see the whole apple to bottle process.

Celebrating ‘100 Years of Orchard History in a Bottle’ the group are encouraging orchard owners to make any excess apple crops available for pressing. All money raised through sales will be put back into Clyde Valley community initiatives.

“Fruit Day is also an opportunity for people to find out more about the history of the Valley,” explains Chair of the Cooperative Cheryl Osbourne. “This year we are launching our branded Clyde Valley Apple Juice. We have been working towards this for a while and are delighted to now be able to offer our new locally grown and produced juice for sale.”

Orchards are an important part of our local heritage and in their heyday in the 19th century the Clyde Valley was Scotland’s leading commercial fruit producing area. The orchards are a beautiful feature of our landscape and provide an important resource at a time when local produce is starting to be valued by consumers. The Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP) is promoting the restoration of the orchards and have supported the planting of almost 700 new apple, plum and pear trees over the last two years.

Entries to this year’s Annual Scarecrow Competition are invited on the theme of orchards, in keeping with the launch of the local juice. The competition is open to all families, nurseries and primary schools and they are encouraged to take inspiration from types of tree, blossom, fruit or biodiversity in the orchards.

A free class trip to Overton Farm is just one of the fantastic prizes to be one which are being sponsored by the Lanarkshire Farmers’ Market. Entry forms can be obtained by emailing [email protected].

Maggie Young from Overton Farm said, “We are delighted to be able to host the event for the 6th year. This year’s Fruit Day will again see a wide range of stalls, apple pressing, displays and information with something to interest to all the family. The Strathaven Jazz Band will have us dancing round the stalls and there’ll be loads of extra fun for the kids.”

There will be cookery demonstrations using local food and an opportunity to sample some special healthy recipes. Strathclyde Woodturners will be offering children the opportunity of ‘turning their own toy’ from local wood and ‘kids’ of all ages can also make their own bird feeders with the RSPB Scotland or self-power their own healthy drink with CAVLP on a smoothie bike.

Fruit Day is being organised by the Rural Development Trust, Clyde Valley Orchards Cooperative Ltd., Lanarkshire Farmers’ Market and Overton Farm. It is supported by Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership and the Scottish Government Community Food Fund.

For more information on the Fruit Day please contact Chris or Cheryl on 01555 665064 or email [email protected]

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16/07/15 CAVLP # , , , , , , ,

Redcoats Launch Mapping the Past Project at Cleghorn Roman Camp

Redcoats Launch Mapping the Past Project at Cleghorn Roman Camp

Guest blog from Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership

An 18th century historic re-enactment survey by local mapping hero William Roy, followed by a local heritage Meet and Greet launched a project exploring the archaeology and heritage of the Clyde and Avon valleys last weekend.

The project, ‘Mapping the Past,’ will be led by CAVLP Heritage and facilitate the exploration of the area’s unique past through map based learning, research, design and making for locals. It is delivered by Northlight Heritage as a partner of the Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP), and supported by Historic Scotland and Renewable Energy Fund managed by South Lanarkshire Council.

Cleghorn Temporary Roman Camp near Lanark was discovered and first surveyed by William Roy in 1764 as part of his comprehensive survey of Roman antiquities of Northern Britain. 225 years after his death, on Friday 10th July, this very survey was re-enacted by the CAVLP Heritage team in full 18th century costume and with authentic survey chain and flag, where they could explore the finer details of 18th century surveying. The survey was preceded by a pilgrimage to the monument of the visionary cartographer’s birthplace at Miltonhead, near Carluke.

A CAVLP Heritage Meet and Greet followed the survey at David Dale’s House in New Lanark the following day. The team introduced visitors to the upcoming workshop streams through a series of activities. They drew maps from the survey data they collected on Friday, one in a traditional style using ink and fountain pens and another in a more creative, crafts based style. The team also ran some small surveys using the 18th century equipment, encouraging visitors to help out and handle the tools.

“It’s great that you’re here telling us about him,” a visitor to New Lanark on July 11th said, “I had heard of William Roy before but I didn’t know he was the father of the Ordnance Survey.”

The two main workshop themes which will run over the summer and autumn, are map-based research workshops and Crafting Maps workshops. The map-based research workshops will introduce participants to using historical maps to explore their heritage and learn about the changing landscape. The Crafting Maps workshops will be focused on creating different kinds of maps so that people can explore their connection to the Clyde and Avon Valleys. The team will also be running and hosting events and activities that will celebrate the rich mapping heritage of the Clyde and Avon Valleys.

“We hope there will be a workshop or event which will allow most people to get involved in some way with CAVLP Heritage.  Please contact the CAVLP Heritage team, whether you are interested in learning more about Major-General William Roy, developing new heritage skills, creating different kinds of maps or volunteering to help research more about the landscape and history of the Clyde and Avon Valleys,” says Gavin MacGregor, a director at Northlight Heritage and Manager of the CAVLP Heritage Programme.

The team encourages anyone who is interested to contact them at [email protected] for further details, or following them on Facebook at CAVLP Heritage or on Twitter @CAVLPHeritage to keep up to date with events and workshops.

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19/01/15 CAVLP , New Lanark World Heritage Site # , , , , , ,

Celebrating a Unique Landscape in the Clyde and Avon Valleys

We’re very happy to welcome Sarah from our partner organisation, The Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership to write a guest post for our blog…

New Lanark World Heritage Site is the most spectacular place I’ve worked in. I could never tire of the sight of the rooftops (blanketed in snow as I type) as I descend the hill in the morning and the powerful flow of the rusty coloured Clyde from our office window in the Old School.

Birds Eye of New Lanark

And that’s what my job as Communications Support at the Heritage Lottery Funded (HLF) Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP) is all about- celebrating the amazing landscape and heritage that make the Clyde and Avon Valleys unique.

New Lanark World Heritage Site is just one of our 10 partners that we work with to deliver 68 different environmental, cultural and historical projects across the Clyde and Avon valleys- distinct through their unmistakeable patchwork of ancient woodlands, gorges, country estates, orchards and market gardening heritage, farmland and industry.

Mauldslie Estate

Projects range from undertaking essential woodland management that look after the area’s rich biodiversity to researching and recording designed landscapes, exhibitions and events.

Here at New Lanark a number of projects have already been completed. Offering something for everyone, these have included woodland pathway restoration, landscape art courses and the creation of Clearburn Natural Play and Picnic Site.

Outdoor enthusiasts can now enjoy the re-instated pathways that criss-cross the woodland overlooking New Lanark. In the 19th century, Robert Owen laid out these pathways for the benefit of the mill-workers which eventually became overgrown and impassable through years of neglect. Now walkers can once again enjoy walks taking in the stunning views down on to the mill complex and the Clyde, just as they were intended.

woodland paths

Those with an interest in the arts were also able to enjoy a talk on the History of Art in the Clyde Valley by Jane Masters, Heritage Manager at New Lanark in Autumn 2013. Following in the footsteps of famous artists such as Alexander Naysmyth and J.M.W. Turner, local artist Veronica Liddell then guided 11 budding artistes in a Landscape Painting Course, using Dundaff Linn as inspiration.

For the more playfully inclined, Clearburn Natural Play and Picnic Site at New Lanark offers far more than a traditional playpark. Opened last Autumn, swings and roundabouts have been omitted in favour of burns and fire pits, and it’s been a joy watching muddy but happy children enjoy the site and surrounding woodland, even through the bleak winter weather.

Lanark Primary School

And there’s plenty more to come, funding dependent. An Art Sculpture Trail featuring artworks will tell stories from local folklore to history and nature of the area, leading from Castlebank Park through New Lanark to the Falls of Clyde, offering new ways to enjoy the landscape. North Lodge Bridge, which once housed a lodge where 19th century visitors would buy tickets to visit the Falls of Clyde, will also be restored as an important access point for visitors to New Lanark and the neighbouring Falls of Clyde.

And that’s just a taster of the variety of projects that are part of the Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership. Check out www.clydeandavonvalley.org, like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for further information on projects, partners, training and volunteering opportunities as well as events.

Sarah – New Lanark Guest blogger (Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership)

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New Lanark World Heritage Site Aerial View

New Lanark is a beautifully restored 18th century cotton mill village in Scotland, and is one of Scotland's six UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

On our blog you'll find a behind-the-scenes look at all the latest news, events, stories and general 'goings-on' from New Lanark World Heritage Site.

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