New Lanark World Heritage Site Blog

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07/06/16 New Lanark World Heritage Site , SWT Falls of Clyde Visitor Centre and Wildlife Reserve # , , , , ,

The best free days out in Scotland

The best free days out in Scotland

Everyone who visits Scotland loves our castles, lochs, whisky and tartan – but there’s so much more to discover! From our fascinating museums to hidden waterfalls and beaches, there’s history, heritage and beauty round every corner just waiting to be found. Here at New Lanark World Heritage Site we don’t have a monster in a loch (maybe in the river?!) but we do have activities that visitors of all ages can enjoy for a different experience of Scotland. In this blog post we have compiled a list of a selection of ‘free’ days out in Scotland to enjoy, including a walk to the famous Falls of Clyde which are right on our doorstep and many under an hour’s drive away!

 

Falls of Clyde Waterfalls & New Lanark

The famous ‘Falls of Clyde’ consists of three magnificent waterfalls on the River Clyde – Dundaff Linn, Corra Linn and Bonnington Linn. Within the Falls of Clyde Wildlife Reserve, you can enjoy a woodland walk to see all three of the Falls – taking in the beautiful surroundings and wildlife spotting as you go! The gateway to the Falls is located in the village of New Lanark, an 18th century mill village which is now recognised as one of Scotland’s 6 World Heritage Sites. New Lanark is located less than 1 hour from Glasgow and Edinburgh and has many attractions and facilities on-site including a Mill Café, Shops, Visitor Centre, Hotel & more.

 

The National Museum of Scotland

The National Museum of Scotland is located in the centre in Edinburgh, just off the Royal Mile. The diverse collections will take you on a journey of discovery through the history of Scotland, the wonders of nature and world cultures – all under one roof. Entry is free and donations are welcome! (By car, just over 1 hour from New Lanark)

 

Riverside Museum

The multi-award winning Riverside Museum is home to over 3,000 objects that detail Glasgow’s rich past from its days as maritime powerhouse to a glimpse into daily Glasgow life in the early to mid 20th Century. Amongst the objects on display are everything from skateboards to locomotives, paintings to prams, velocipedes to voiturettes, vintage cars to a stormtrooper, there really is something to delight visitors of all ages.​ (By car, just under 1 hour from New Lanark)

#zahahadid #riversidemuseum

A photo posted by Im\not/Laurent 🍀 (@im.lrt) on

 

Galloway Forest Park

The Forest Park has everything you need for a great day out, whatever the time of year. Meet red deer and wild goats, choose from two scenic Forest Drives, follow in the footsteps of Robert the Bruce or picnic beside a peaceful loch. This is also Scotland’s first Dark Sky Park – one of the best places to stargaze in Europe. (By car, around 1.5 hours from New Lanark)

Such a pretty place 🚣🏞 #scotland #gallowayforestpark #camping #lochdoon

A photo posted by Helen (@helen_deed) on

 

Beaches in Scotland

Visit Scotland: “Golden sands, turquoise waters, peaceful bays and tumbling waves … there are few finer places than a beautiful Scottish beach on a warm summer’s day! With thousands of miles of coastline and more than 700 islands, Scotland boasts beaches to rival even the most tropical holiday destination. Each is ideal for long walks or relaxing with a tasty picnic, but you’ll find plenty of other things to keep you entertained, too: wildlife watching, fossil hunting, thrilling watersports and much more…”

 

Glenfinnan Viaduct

Visit Glenfinnan: “This wonderful piece of late Victorian construction is a site to behold. Completed in 1901 the viaduct was the first structure in the world to use at that time the new building material Mass Concrete. Over 100 feet in height and made up of 21 arches this viaduct is a beautiful piece of engineering and is a glorious sight. The viaduct has now gained notoriety as it has been used in many of the the Harry Potter films. Do you remember the “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets” with the blue Ford Anglia flying around the engine and the viaduct?” (By car, just over 3 hours from New Lanark)

Glenfinnan Viaduct. Still minus a steam train 🚂. #Glenfinnan #glenfinnanviaduct #lochshiel #visitscotland #instascotland

A photo posted by Kyle Macintyre (@macintyrekyle) on

 

Loch Lomond & Trossachs National Park

Loch Lomond is the largest body of freshwater in mainland Britain. It has been used by generations of Scots and visitors for boating, water skiing, bathing and picnicking, or just enjoying the unique atmosphere and scenery. Loch Lomond can be reached in just under an hour from Glasgow City Centre! Find out more on this website. (By car, just over 1 hour, 15 minutes from New Lanark)

 

St.Andrews

One of Europe’s finest towns, St Andrews is a place of history, learning and culture, a wonderful coastal resort, and the world’s home of golf. (By car, just under 2 hours from New Lanark)

 

Glencoe

Glencoe is perhaps Scotland’s most famous and most scenic glen. Glencoe is also arguably Scotland’s most historic glen, and it was recently voted as Scotland’s most romantic glen. Recently featured in James Bond Skyfall!

 

New Lanark is the perfect base for exploring the rest of Scotland. As well as being located on the banks of the fantastic Falls of Clyde Wildlife Reserve, we have a range of accommodation options on-site to suit all budgets and tastes including the New Lanark Mill Hotel, Wee Row Hostel and 8 self-catering cottages. Visit our website to find out more!

New Lanark aerial 2010 - 100827 - 1559 (Medium) (Small)

Aerial view of New Lanark World Heritage Site

Melissa – New Lanark Marketing and PR Officer

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26/01/16 CAVLP # , , , , , ,

Kirkyard Tales: The Butcher, The Baker, The Candlestick Maker

Kirkyard Tales: The Butcher, The Baker, The Candlestick Maker

Guest post from Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership

Help exhume secrets of souls laid to rest at St Ninian’s Kirkyard, Stonehouse, by volunteering to take part in a FREE archaeological project on Saturday 6 and Sunday 7 February.

Join CAVLP Heritage and Stonehouse Heritage Group to help shed light on the lives and work of 17th and 18th century bakers, millers, masons, weavers, blacksmiths, farmers and their families, by recording the tools of the trades depicted on the headstones.

No experience of archaeology is necessary – FREE training will be provided in using the latest 3D recording techniques to digitise the gravestones, and there will be activities for all ages and abilities.

“These type of stones were popular in the 17th and 18th century across the whole of Scotland, and they allow us to construct a picture of the people that were living and working around Stonehouse at this time,” explains CAVLP Heritage Officer Dr Paul Murtagh.

He continues, “It would be great if people could help us record these stones so that we can explore the industrial, horticultural and agricultural heritage of the area.”

John Young of the Stonehouse Heritage Group has been recording St Ninian’s Kirkyard for years. He explains that, “As a community we need to work together to preserve our ancestral history in teaching new generations to respect and take pride in preserving our village’s heritage.”

He continues, “One way we can do this is by promoting the importance of graveyards to local residents – helping them understand their historical context, as well as the significance of the carvings etched on the headstones. These records in stone provide us with an insight into the period in which they were erected and stand as monuments to the people who shaped the communities in which we live today.”

The initiative is part of a wider project, Capturing the Past, which is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP) and Historic Scotland, and managed by Northlight Heritage. The project seeks to research and record a variety of local sites of archaeological interest, so there are a plethora of opportunities to get involved in numerous sites of archaeological interest throughout the Clyde and Avon valleys.

A series of FREE, hands-on learning opportunities relating to the historical working lives of people in the Clyde and Avon valleys are also available from the CAVLP Heritage team and run concurrently with the Capturing the Past project until August. MapCRAFT, Tasting Through Time, Sheep to Shawl and Brick by Brick courses explore the mapping, agricultural, horticultural and industrial heritage unique to the area. Designed to fit in with the Curriculum for Excellence, Duke of Edinburgh and John Muir Awards as well as Badge Activities for Guides, Scout and the Boys and Girls Brigade, courses can be tailored to meet the needs of any age group and ability and can last between 2 to 4 hours.

The FREE weekend event at St Ninian’s Kirkyard, Stonehouse, will offer volunteers a chance to engage in the latest techniques used by archaeologists to digitally record sites, and to help enhance the record of this important historical kirkyard. Further events and training weekends will take place on the first and third weekends in February, March and April.

Saturday 6 and Sunday 7 of February – Archaeological survey of St Ninian’s Kirkyard

St Ninians Kirkyard and Stonehouse Lifestyles, 10.30am – 3.30pm, adults, children and families all welcome. Free but booking essential. For more information and to book, call 1555 661555 or email Paul and Karen at [email protected].

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19/08/15 Events at New Lanark , New Lanark Search Room , New Lanark World Heritage Site # , , , , , , ,

New Lanark welcomes visitors for ‘Doors Open’ Weekend 2015

New Lanark welcomes visitors for ‘Doors Open’ Weekend 2015

On Saturday 12th & Sunday 13th September New Lanark will take part in the nationwide Doors Open Days initiative, giving visitors a fantastic opportunity to explore its buildings not usually open to the public.

Between 12pm and 4pm the Counting House, Robert Owen’s School for Children, The Search Room and War Memorial Garden will be open to the public for free. Also open will be the ‘Museum Stair’ tenement. This derelict building is one of 8 in Double Row, a block of tenements which will be restored as part of a £4million project funded by Historic Scotland and the Heritage Lottery Fund. Due to the building’s historic & fragile interior it is currently only open for special events. As part of the project an exciting new 3D virtual tour of the ‘Museum Stair’ interior will be opening within the New Lanark Visitor Centre in future years.

The Counting House

The Counting House

Double Row - Museum Stair

Double Row – Museum Stair

During the Doors Open Weekend there will also be lots of free activities for families to enjoy as part of the Scottish Archaeology and Heritage Festival. Craft workshops will be held allowing visitors to try their hand at printing historic wallpaper, and families will be able to discover historic artefacts around New Lanark & claim a prize with the fun Discovery Trail.

There’s so much going on for Doors Open Weekend that New Lanark’s founders, Richard Arkwright and David Dale, will be travelling forward in time to see how New Lanark has changed since they founded it in 1785. They will also be giving free tours of the site to visitors and there are sure to be hilarious results!

School for Children

Robert Owen’s School for Children

The Search Room

The Search Room

War Memorial garden

War Memorial Garden

Visitors on Doors Open Weekend can also take advantage of a special offer of 25% off visitor centre tickets, allowing them to explore other parts of the site including the Annie McLeod Experience Ride, Millworkers’ Housing, Village Store Exhibition and Robert Owen’s House.

Further information on Doors Open Days at New Lanark, and New Lanark’s upcoming events including the 2015 Book Festival in October can be found at www.newlanark.org

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23/07/15 Exhibitions at New Lanark # , , , ,

‘World Wide Weave’ arrives in New Lanark

‘World Wide Weave’ arrives in New Lanark

Guest blog by Peter Bateson – Development Coordinator and Exhibition Curator for the Camphill Foundation…

A collection of vibrant pieces of textile art created in Camphill communities across the globe will be on display for two weeks in New Lanark’s visitor centre. After more than a year of preparation, and seven months of touring in England and Wales, Camphill Foundation’s World Wide Weave Exhibition arrives in Scotland for the first time at New Lanark where it will be shown from 23rd July – 6th August.

World Wide weave exhibition

The 75 textile works have been created and collected to celebrate the 75th Anniversary of the Camphill Movement which began on 1st June 1940. On this date the first small group of pioneers moved into Camphill House by the River Dee at Milltimber near Aberdeen. Camphill communities provide schools and colleges for children and young people living with developmental problems and learning disabilities and communities for adults where everyone can live, learn and work with others in an environment of mutual respect and equality.

The World Wide Weave project has involved hundreds of people all over the Camphill Movement in 19 distinct nations and regions, with contributions created in 61 communities in Scotland, Northern Ireland, England, Wales, Ireland, Netherlands, France, Switzerland, Austria, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Russia, USA, Canada, South Africa, India and Vietnam. The common theme was “Our community’s relationship to its physical and social environment”, but each place was free to develop its own original interpretation. The exhibition also includes a small number of special pieces contributed by individual master weavers and tapestry makers.

Every one of the 75 pieces is unique and has its own story to tell. For example, there is a beautiful felting of the Russian landscape from the Camphill day-centre Turmalin in Moscow, where at first they were not sure they could do anything at all and then completed and delivered a masterpiece in record time. There is an enchanting tapestry of Tapola in Finland, brimful of colour and details of the village and its life, and a similar brilliantly coloured creation from Kyle in Ireland. There is a matching pair of Spring and Autumn feltings from Corbenic in Perthshire, breathtaking in their artistry, colour and detail.

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From Camphill School Aberdeen comes panel number 1 (quite rightly), a tapestry which incorporates a wealth of archetypal Camphill imagery and symbolism in one richly coloured and textured composition. In some pieces, for example from Mountshannon (Ireland), Rotvoll (Norway), Oaklands Park (England) and Loch Arthur (Scotland) it is the actual woven texture which is paramount, as the background to a symphony of colour which constitutes a whole world of experience in itself. From California there are two complementary semi-abstract pieces representing the wide panorama of the ocean and the majestic verticality of the redwood forest.

The World Wide Weave is an artistic endeavour, meant to be appreciated and enjoyed as such, but also it carries with it at least four messages. First of all, it embodies the principle of Unity in Diversity. Despite their huge variation in size, location and task and the incredibly rich mix of people who constantly interweave their lives and destinies in the network of Camphill communities, they all have the same set of core principles at heart. The exhibition expresses all the wonderfully varied and diverse characteristics of single communities coming together in one great artistic panorama of Camphill. Secondly, the exhibition carries a fundamental statement of equality regarding the potential of people with learning disabilities. The weavers, felters, tapestry-makers and embroiderers are artists and artisans in their own right and can place their work alongside that of mainstream artists and craftspeople.

A third element is that different individuals in a group have collaborated on a single piece of art, each contributing what they could towards the finished work. This has been a major feature in the development of the World Wide Weave. It has been a renewed experience of community cooperation and an example of social weaving along with the actual textile work. Many other people have also been involved in those pieces which incorporate other materials such as pottery, metal and wood, bringing together different workshops active in the community. A good example is the brilliant seaside image from Camphill Devon which has a colourful background of multi-textured weaving with felted and beadwork flowers, copper leaves, ceramic butterflies and wooden birds!

And fourth, most of the communities have used entirely home produced and in many cases also recycled materials in the World Wide Weave. A few of the exhibits are composed almost entirely of recycled materials. Caring for our natural resources, recycling and renewal is a special theme that runs throughout the exhibition.

The connection between New Lanark and Camphill goes very deep. The economic model of life in a Camphill community was strongly inspired by the work of Robert Owen and his efforts to establish a humane, just and fair economy in which everyone’s needs could adequately be met. He was seen by the founders of Camphill as a forerunner of their own commitment to the principle of brother/sisterhood in the economic sphere. In fact, Robert Owen is regarded as one of three ‘stars’ of Camphill, pioneering historical figures who laid the foundations for what were later formulated as Camphill essentials in education, social life and economics.

During the past seven months, visitors to the exhibition in England and Wales have been deeply affected by the range and richness of colour in the exhibits and the incredible variety and complexity of techniques on display. Through the texts and photos that accompany the exhibits they experience what they describe as a joyful, uplifting and life-affirming message. Last, but not least, they are deeply impressed by the skill and ability shown by the craftspeople and by the spirit of creative collaboration which is so much a part of that process. As one visitor in Bristol expressed it, “the best thing of all is that it so clearly comes from a living experience of community, and that’s something that we all need nowadays”.

Please come to see this spectacular show in the historic and very appropriate setting of New Lanark World Heritage Site. 23rd July – 6th August 2015, New Lanark Institute. 10am-5pm. Free entry!

You can follow the progress of the tour on the website www.camphillfoundation.net which will have all relevant information about the various venues, and also updates appearing regularly on Facebook/camphill-foundation-uk-ireland and Twitter @camphillFD.

The exhibition will move on to other venues in Scotland, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland and in 2016 to Switzerland, Norway and North America.

Peter Bateson – Development Coordinator and Exhibition Curator

The World Wide Weave Exhibition at New Lanark

The World Wide Weave Exhibition at New Lanark

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New Lanark World Heritage Site Aerial View

New Lanark is a beautifully restored 18th century cotton mill village in Scotland, and is one of Scotland's six UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

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