New Lanark World Heritage Site Blog

garden diary

05/07/17 Roof Garden # , , , , , , , ,

New Lanark Garden Diary: Summer 2017

New Lanark Garden Diary: Summer 2017

June and July 2017

As the longest day passes, the summer begins.  In New Lanark Roof Garden, the combination of curry plant, and lavender with the dark pink of the tall penstemons, creates the appearance of a soft summer meadow in miniature. The yellow flag irises at the back of the garden didn’t do too well this year as the spring was warm and very dry, and they like moist soil.   At ground level, the area  between the Hotel and the first bridge over the lade is the lade overflow.  It is a full working part of New Lanark’s power generation system but has become an ecological niche in its own right.  Look out for the lovely flowing green stems and white flowers of the water crowfoot.  This amazing plant is adapted to live under the water with the flowers emerging on the surface.

Water crowfoot in the Mill Lade

Also look for the purple spires of watermint and frothy white heads of meadowsweet.  Later in July, little yellow monkey flowers will appear with them.  Robins, dippers and wagtails, also enjoy this environment with its flowing water and plenty of places at the side to perch.

Click here to find out more about visiting New Lanark and our current summer exhibition, Brick City!

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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07/02/17 Roof Garden # , , , ,

New Lanark Gardens Diary – February 2017

New Lanark Gardens Diary – February 2017

New Lanark Gardens Diary – February 2017

February light glows on the stonework of the houses at New Lanark as seen from the path into the Clyde Valley Nature Reserve.   The island in the middle of the river is called Mid Inch on which a tall evergreen Scots pine tree has found a foothold.  The stones at the water’s edge are the haunt of a heron.  Nearby in the village is New Lanark’s Clearburn Natural Outdoor Play & Picnic Area.  There are squirrels hiding under the ivy covering the old trees and a pair of tiny wrens have been spotted flying in and out of the lade tunnel.  (The scientific name for a wren is ‘troglodytes’ meaning ‘cave dweller’!)  Playing outdoors is now recognised as essential for children’s cognitive and emotional development, so bring the kids along and see what else you can spot (entry to the Clearburn Play Area is free). If the weather isn’t great there’s always the indoor Interactive Gallery! 

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

Here are some more photos of the village in early February…

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New Lanark World Heritage Site Aerial View

New Lanark is a beautifully restored 18th century cotton mill village in Scotland, and is one of Scotland's six UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

On our blog you'll find a behind-the-scenes look at all the latest news, events, stories and general 'goings-on' from New Lanark World Heritage Site.

We are always looking for guest bloggers to become involved with the blog. If you are interested in writing for us, please get in touch.

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