New Lanark World Heritage Site Blog

history

19/10/17 New Lanark Mill Café , New Lanark Mill Shop , New Lanark Visitor Centre , New Lanark World Heritage Site # , ,

Learn, History, Laugh, Repeat

Learn, History, Laugh, Repeat

History in the making

“History, like love, is so apt to surround her heroes with an atmosphere of imaginary brightness.”
James Fenimore Cooper, The Last of the Mohicans    

Ever wondered what it was like to live in the 1800s?

Are you a History Buff that likes to step back in to yesteryear and discover the very foundation of the land ?

If you have answered yes to either of these questions then New Lanark World Heritage Site is the place for you.

Tour and Attractions

Watch history come alive at New Lanark, with our fantastic tour, where you are taken back to the time of Robert Owen, the revolutionary who took the world of textile production by storm. You  will learn key facts about his time here, what he did and what he is remembered for. History tells us that Robert had a firm belief that  every child had the right to an education and the right to play, and you will learn of New Lanark’s transformation from a humble mill to a hub for all cultures and nationalities, which brought people together for the common good.

Let the spirit of Annie McLeod guide you as you take your journey on the ”Annie  McLeod Experience” Dark Ride, where Annie takes you on a fascinating journey of discovery as she tells her story of life in New Lanark in 1820 and the changes Robert Owens made to the lives of the children who worked in the mill.

Home is where the heart is , visit Robert Owen’s House and also learn of his history , from running New Lanark, to setting up shop on the banks of Indiana’s  Washbank river.

Historic Shopping

Why not pop over to the New Lanark Mill Shop, where we offer a fantastic range of contemporary gifts, books and Scottish produce. Also on display in our shop are fabulous textile creations made from yarn produced on site using our historic textile machinery. Like most of us here, if you have a sweet tooth , then the New Lanark Village Store is for you, where we stock a variety of traditional sweeties ( Yum Yum).

 

Peckish?

After a long day at New Lanark does find one rather Peckish, in that case why not stop in at our New Lanark Mill Café, which offers a fantastic range of lunches, home baking, light bites and also offers our multi award-winning New Lanark Ice Cream

Or if you are up for some fine dining , New Lanark Mill Hotel welcomes non-residents to the Hotel Bar and One Restaurant wither its for a quick bite or sitting down for dinner expect top quality food and service from our wonderful staff.

You cant take in the history of New Lanark  on a empty stomach can you ?

Sound Off

Make history today,  please visit: www.newlanark.org, call us on 01555 661345 or email [email protected]

Click here to find out more about New Lanark’s Daily Guided Tours

But from me it’s

Ciao For Now

Craig- New Lanark Marketing Intern

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20/04/17 Behind the scenes at New Lanark # , , , , ,

Meet the Guides: Alex

Meet the Guides: Alex

Over the next few weeks we’ll be posting a blog to introduce you to our new team members…

Name: Alex Davies

Hometown: Dunbar

When did you start working at New Lanark? March 2017

What is your dream job or career? To be a museum education officer or a children’s author.

What’s your favourite spot at New Lanark? By the Falls.

What’s your favourite aspect of New Lanark’s history? Robert Owen and what he did to make his Millworkers lives better.

What’s your favourite thing about working at New Lanark? Friendly people and a beautiful place to work.

If you had to describe New Lanark in one word, what would it be? Inspiring!

If you could invite any character or person from history to a dinner party, who would it be and why? Oscar Wilde – I think he’d be very witty.

If you could live in any period of history what would it be and why? 1890s in France, I like Art Nouveau.

What other Scottish attractions or historical locations do you enjoy visiting? National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh.

As part of Alex’s role as one of our Visitor Attraction Assistants he will be helping deliver our new programme of ‘Story of New Lanark’ guided tours which will be running daily at 11am and 2pm. The tours are included with a Visitor Attraction ticket or visitors can also pay £5 seperately to just go on one of the tours.

You can find out more about visiting New Lanark and purchase Visitor Attraction tickets online at www.newlanark.org

Alex and our other new staff members

Melissa – New Lanark Marketing and PR Officer

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19/04/17 Uncategorized # , , , , , , ,

A taster of Archaeology at New Lanark

A taster of Archaeology at New Lanark

On Tuesday 18th April New Lanark took part in the global ‘World Heritage Day’ celebrations, showcasing what makes each of the 1,052 UNESCO World Heritage Sites unique and worthy of “outstanding universal value”.

A variety of activities took place at New Lanark over the Easter weekend from 16th – 18th April – all celebrating our unique heritage. These ranged from a Scanathon on Monday, a yarnbomb on Tuesday (you can read all about it here) and three days of Archaeology Taster Tours!

The tours were designed to give visitors a unique opportunity to get a taster of archaeology by seeing volunteers at work excavating post-abandonment deposits from 1 Double Row’s basement. There was an archaeologist on hand to explain the process and let visitors know about any interesting “finds”. As well as visiting the Double Row tenement block, the tour also visited the site of Mantilla Row where visitors had the chance to find out more about this lost building in New Lanark’s history. The tours were delivered by Northlight Heritage.

We went along on the last tour of the series on World Heritage Day…

Inspecting the visible (above ground) archaeology of Mill One – New Lanark Mill Hotel

After three days of excavation work the volunteers begin the backfilling so as to protect the finds for future generations and minimise disruption to the excavated area

Showing some of the fantastic restoration work to the exterior of Double Row

Feature details, like these wrought iron air vents have been maintained throughout the building to create a high-quality and authentic historic conservation

Amy, an Archaeology Student from the University of Glasgow has been volunteering on the Double Row excavation project

One of the three trenches excavated in the basement of 1 Double Row

Excavations have uncovered the fascinating area of paving stones, deliberately arranged so as to have a defined, curved edge – perhaps to allow the flow of another pathway from the doorway into the basement

The scaffolding is in the process of being removed at Double Row

Finishing touches on the stonework

Next on the tour, we saw the demarcation of Mantilla Row – where the exterior walls, doors and windows would have stood

The little-known history of Mantilla Row

A fascinating insight into the many names Mantilla Row has been known as through the years – the exact origins of its name are still unknown, but the presiding theory is that the name has evolved over the years through oral tradition and may have also been altered through interpretation of handwriting or accents!

 

The Archaeology Taster Tours were funded by a Townscape Heritage / Conservation Area Regeneration Scheme which is taking place at New Lanark over the next three years. Phase 1 of this large scale restoration project began in March 2016 and consisted of the restoration of Double Row, an 18th century tenement building. In 2017, Phase 2 of this project will include the construction of low rubble walls to indicate where the Mantilla Row tenement once stood before its demolition in 1988 and the repair and consolidation of the Church Wall. Total costs for this large scale regeneration project are over £4m. The two main funders are the Heritage Lottery Fund through its Townscape Heritage (TH) programme and Historic Environment Scotland through its Conservation Area Regeneration Scheme (CARS). Additional funding has been secured from the Renewable Energy Fund (South Lanarkshire Council), The Wolfson Foundation and New Lanark Trust.

 

If you would like to be kept up to date about any future activities linked to the project please sign up for New Lanark’s monthly e-newsletter here.

Melissa – Marketing and PR Officer

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25/01/17 CAVLP # , , , ,

Frame the landscape with CAVLP Heritage

Frame the landscape with CAVLP Heritage

Guest post from Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership

The Clyde and Avon Valley has long been a destination for visitors, including esteemed artists and writers such as J. M. W. Turner, the Wordsworths and Sir Walter Scott.

Known for its patchwork of nationally important woodlands and stunning geological formations, crumbling castles and orchard heritage, the area has fired the imagination of visitors throughout the ages.

CAVLP Heritage are now offering a unique way to explore the landscape through the eyes of artists, writers, photographers and film-makers by way of a series of six FREE Framing the Landscape walks where paintings, photos, films and literature will be used to see the landscape in new ways.

Taking place every Saturday at 2pm, from 11 February up to and including 19 March, the walks will offer a tantalizing look at figures that have been inspired by the landscape or have made an impact on it in some way. Think Sir Walter Scott and Craignethan Castle, J. M. W. Turner at the Falls of Clyde and even Scott’s Jam Works at Carluke.

These events will form part of a larger project called Local Landscape Heroes which is focusing on the people who historically changed and maintained the character of the historic environment and landscape and those that have been inspired by it.

People of all ages and backgrounds are invited to take part in this programme of exploratory walks throughout the Clyde and Avon Valley.  The events will be led by experienced archaeologists from CAVLP Heritage who will be on hand to offer expert insight into areas at Chatelherault, Lanark, Wishaw, Craignethan Castle, Falls of Clyde and New Lanark, and Carluke.

There are 6 different walks to choose from. Each takes around two hours and is FREE although booking is essential at www.cavlp.eventbrite.co.uk. Participants are encouraged to attend as many as they like.

Saturday 11 February: Inspired by the Oaks – Scenery Stroll at Chatelherault: Join the team at Chatelherault to explore artwork inspired by the Avon Water and Cadzow Oaks.  Learn about the painters including Alexander Fraser and Simon Bough, who were inspired by the natural beauty of the Avon Valley landscape.

Saturday 18 February: Country Makers – Worthy Wander in Lanark: Explore the historical figures who helped to shape the town of Lanark through its early days, including William Wallace, David I, William the Lion and Robert Forrest. Visit sites of local importance to Lanark and explore the artistic representations of the deeds of past country-makers.

Saturday 25 February: Wishaw on Film – Snapshot Saunter in Wishaw: Explore how Wishaw has been represented on film and visit some of the sites featured in old photographs and films. Learn about the lives of local photographers and filmmakers such as Charles Reid and Enrico Cocozza, and how they were inspired by their local landscape.

Saturday 4 March: Inspired by the Castle: Poetic Promenade at Craignethan: Join us on a journey from the Clyde Valley up to Craignethan Castle and enjoy the literature of local and visiting writers such as Sir Walter Scott and Janet Hamilton, who were inspired by the landscape and the castle.

Saturday 11 March: Inspired by the Falls – Representation Ramble at New Lanark: Take a look at the art and literature inspired by the Falls of Clyde and New Lanark, and learn about ­the artists such as Samuel Taylor Coleridge and J. M. W. Turner who created it.

Saturday 18 March: Strawberry Fields – Jelly Jaunt in Carluke: Celebrate the achievements of the Scott brothers in starting the strawberry growing industry in the Clyde and Avon Valley, and the long heritage of preserve making that continues today. Take a look at old photographs that help to tell their story and the story of fruit growing in the Carluke area.

Karen McCusker, CAVLP Heritage Project Assistant, says: “This is a great opportunity to get to know a little bit more about the local people who have shaped the Clyde and Avon Valley that we know and love today, in a fun and unexpected way.”

The walks are part of the Local Landscape Heroes project which celebrates the people that have shaped and been inspired the Clyde and Avon Valley, from farmers to millers and poets to painters. The project is managed by Northlight Heritage with funding from Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership and Historic Environment Scotland.

Volunteers can also join CAVLP Heritage in researching Local Landscape Heroes of the Clyde and Avon Valley in Hamilton Town House Archives every Thursday up to and including 30 March, between 11am – 7pm.

If you would like to get involved, or would love to know more, please get in touch with CAVLP Heritage at [email protected] or 01555 661 555. Booking is necessary in order to take part and can be done through e-mail.

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18/01/17 New Lanark World Heritage Site # , , , , ,

Days out in Scotland for History Buffs

Days out in Scotland for History Buffs

Are you a self proclaimed history buff? Scotland is the place for you to be! From castles on (almost) every corner, and lochs strewn across the land – our country is packed full of fascinating historical locations which make for a great day out.

As if you needed another reason to get exploring, 2017 has been designated as the ‘Year of History, Heritage & Archaeology’ by Visit Scotland! If you need some inspiration, below are some of our favourite suggestions for ‘historic’ days out in Scotland. Many of these locations are around 1 hour from New Lanark, making the New Lanark Hotel or Wee Row Hostel a perfect base to explore from if you’re planning a holiday to Scotland.

 

 

New Lanark World Heritage Site

Visit New Lanark Mills to discover one of Scotland’s 6 UNESCO World Heritage Sites of ‘outstanding universal importance’. Explore the stunning woodland surroundings and see the famous Falls of Clyde waterfalls. Experience over 200 years of social history and industrial heritage.

Find out more about visiting at www.newlanark.org

New Lanark World Heritage Site

 

 

Scottish Fisheries Museum (2 hours from New Lanark)

“In a spectacular location opposite the harbour in the fishing village of Anstruther, in the East Neuk of Fife, we are a National Museum, telling the story of the Scottish fishing industry, its boats, harbours and communities.”

Find out more about visiting at www.scotfishmuseum.org

 

Glasgow Cathedral (50 minutes from New Lanark)

The first stone built Glasgow Cathedral was dedicated in the presence of King David I in 1136. The present building was consecrated in 1197. Since that same period the Cathedral has never been unroofed and the worship of God has been carried out within its walls for more than 800 years.

The splendid achievements of the architects and builders of those far off days can be studied and admired. Not everything, however, is old and the Cathedral has one of the finest post-war collections of stained glass windows to be found in Britain.

Find out more about visiting at www.glasgowcathedral.org

 

National Mining Museum (1 hour from New Lanark)

“The museum provides a great day out for all ages! We’re based at one of the finest surviving examples of a Victorian colliery in Europe, the Lady Victoria Colliery at Newtongrange, just nine miles south of Edinburgh. Visitors to the museum will marvel at the sheer size of the place, be astounded by the engineering brilliance behind all the machinery and retrace the footsteps and struggles of the thousands of miners and their families before them.”

Find out more about visiting at www.nationalminingmuseum.com

 

Rosslyn Chapel (1 hour from New Lanark)

Rosslyn Chapel was founded in 1446 as a place of worship and services continue to be held here weekly. The Chapel has also been a popular destination for visitors for generations. By the late 18th-century, it was starting to appear on itineraries and its profile greatly increased after the publication of Dan Brown’s novel, The Da Vinci Code, in 2003, and the subsequent film. Rosslyn Chapel Trust was established in 1995 to care for the Chapel and oversee its conservation and public access.

Find out more about visiting at www.rosslynchapel.com

Rosslyn Chapel

Image Credit http://www.rosslynchapel.com/

 

Palace of Holyroodhouse ( 1 hour 15 minutes from New Lanark)

Visit The Palace of Holyroodhouse, Her Majesty The Queen’s official residence in Scotland. Standing at the end of Edinburgh’s historic Royal Mile, this fine palace is the home of Scottish royal history. At the Palace of Holyroodhouse, visitors can explore 14 magnificent historic and State Apartments, the romantic ruins of the 12th-century Holyrood Abbey and remarkable royal gardens, all with a complimentary audio tour. Best known as the home of Mary, Queen of Scots, the Palace was the setting for many dramatic episodes in her short reign. Today, the State Apartments are used regularly by The Queen for State ceremonies and official entertaining. The Queen’s Gallery at the Palace of Holyroodhouse hosts a programme of changing exhibitions from the Royal Collection.

Find out more about visiting here.

 

Bo’ness & Kinneil Railway (1 hour from New Lanark)

“Our heritage railway is only 40 minutes drive from Glasgow and Edinburgh. We are located in the historic town of Bo’ness. Friendly staff will welcome you aboard a heritage steam or diesel-hauled train and wish you a pleasant journey. The train travels along the shore of the Firth of Forth with views of the majestic Ochil Hills, before climbing a tree-lined gradient, passing woodland, wild flowers and waterfalls to the country station of Birkhill. Alight here to take a stroll in the ancient woodlands of the Avon Gorge.”

Find out more about visiting at www.www.bkrailway.co.uk

 

Dunadd Fort (suggested by our Facebook fan Samantha Grant)

Dunadd Fort rises proudly from Moine Mhor – the ‘great moss’ – an expanse of bog that carpets the southern end of Kilmartin Glen. It was home to a fort 2,000 years ago, and a royal power centre of Gaelic kings in the 500s to 800s AD. Below the mighty fort site are some extraordinary features carved into the rock, including two human footprint shapes – similar to a pair found at Clickimin Broch.

Find out more about visiting here.

 

Govan Stones (suggested by our Facebook fan Philip Pohler)

History buffs can discover the unique collection of early medieval stones carved in the 9th-11th centuries to commemorate the power of those who ruled the Kingdom of Strathclyde. One of Glasgow’s most important historical and cultural assets, explore the 31 monuments within the beautiful setting of Govan Old Church.

Find out more about visiting at www.thegovanstones.org.uk

Govan Stones

Image credit http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-18172678

 

We’ve definitely been inspired to get out and explore after reading about all of these amazing locations! You can find out more about visiting New Lanark here.

Melissa – New Lanark Marketing and PR Officer

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31/10/16 Double Row Restoration Project # , , ,

1 Year of the New Lanark House History Project

1 Year of the New Lanark House History Project

Guest blog by Ruth Beattie, Head Researcher and Learning Officer…

In November 2015 I began a research project linked to the Townscape Heritage Project for the restoration of Double Row; the last derelict tenement at New Lanark to be restored.

Research would focus on the social history of the tenement, the families and past residents who lived there and of the history of people in the village. We chose the time period from 1900 to the 1970s for three reasons: it was the most recent time period in the building’s history, many past residents with memories of relatives and living their themselves had been identified and it was a time of great change in Scotland in terms of the world wars, the decline of industry, the modernisation of housing and of people’s lifestyles.

children-on-rosedale-street-c-1950s

Children on Rosedale Street c.1950s (Double Row)

When I began the project, I looked at the existing known New Lanark families living in Double Row from the early 1900s. Researching the village in the First World War had given me a good understanding of the family names, connections and their backgrounds. At this time in particular, many Irish weaving families had settled in New Lanark and were employed in the mills weaving nets and canvas for the Gourock Ropework Company.

Names such as Jess (of which there are around 5 separate families!), Harkness, Bones, Savage, Hawthorne, Leggatte, Lynas and Ashe among many others, came up time and again along with Scottish or long standing New Lanark names such as Mackin, MacPherson, Arnott, Kirkhope, Hay, Goddard, Dunlop, Romer, and Graham.

11-rosedale-st-c-1968

11 Rosedale Street c.1968 (Double Row) where Irish lady Susan Rocks lived.

Hugh Mackin with sister-in-law Susan Rocks at her flat 11 Rosedale Street (Double Row) in 1966

Hugh Mackin with his Aunt Susan Rocks at her flat 11 Rosedale Street (Double Row) in 1966

Then it was time to open the research to those people who had lived here, were born here, grew up here or simply remembered their relatives living here and held fond, happy memories of the village. The initial response was fantastic. We advertised in local Lanarkshire papers, on our website and social media and around our site. Many people got in touch with me from all over Britain and even as far as Canada! Through emails, phone calls and visits to our search-room we have pieced together the stories of the families recording memories and with documents and family photos. We now have 24 separate New Lanark family stories. Each family has a file containing a biography in progress, photos, documents and any interesting finds such as newspaper articles of the time or oral history interviews recorded in the 1980s.

The last resident to leave Double Row in the 1970s – Elizabeth Jess. Pictured with her grandson David Dunlop who was born there and lives in Lanark today. David has contributed immensely to the social history of the village.

The last resident to leave Double Row in the 1970s – Elizabeth Jess. Pictured with her grandson David Dunlop who was born there and lives in Lanark today. David has contributed immensely to the social history of the village.

 

Elizabeth with husband Joseph Henry Jess and son Thomas in September 1935.

Elizabeth with husband Joseph Henry Jess and son Thomas in September 1935.

 

chidren-in-snow-at-square-1950s-child-at-front-is-harry-jess

Harry Jess as a child at New Lanark (front with spade). Harry is the grandson of Elizabeth Jess and a cousin of David Dunlop. He also lives in Lanark today.

One of the most interesting stories to come out of the research was of the lost letter to Double Row resident Mary Savage, written in 1916 by a friend in County Antrim, Ireland after the family had moved to New Lanark. You can read more about this story on our blog post from June 2016 by our marketing intern Ronan Moore.

Sisters Margaret and Mary Savage who lived at 3 Double Row – the letter was written by Mary’s friend Annie Lynn from County Antrim, Ireland in 1916.

Sisters Margaret and Mary Savage who lived at 3 Double Row – the letter was written by Mary’s friend Annie Lynn from County Antrim, Ireland in 1916.

I would like to thank all the families who have been in touch for their amazing contribution and the volunteers helping with the research. As we move into the second phase* of the research project, we really couldn’t be in a better position with a wealth of interesting stories to build upon.

The Harkness family who lived at 9 Double Row.

The Harkness family who lived at 9 Double Row.

New Lanark is a special place and it means so very much to people whose families lived and worked here in the time of the mills. This has been perhaps the most moving aspect of the research and it is truly rewarding to be able to bring those family stories together. I hope that we can produce a legacy from the project to last and that would not have been possible without people’s memories of a past life, their enthusiasm and their sense of pride at having a connection to this historic village.

*Information about phase two of the project coming in early 2017.

Ruth Beattie, Head Researcher and Learning Officer, New Lanark Trust.

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12/09/16 CAVLP # , , , , ,

Mapping the Past exhibition

Mapping the Past exhibition

This morning we went to see the newly opened ‘Mapping the Past’ exhibition at Lanark Library. The exhibition and guide explores the unique cartographic heritage of the Clyde and Avon Valley and a 2000 year history of mapping in Scotland, including connections to the Father of Modern Mapping, Carluke born Major-General William Roy and local sites of interest, such as the area’s trig pillars.

img_4028-large

The Mapping the Past exhibition and guide launch corresponds with the 80th birthday celebrations of the Trig Pillar this year. The first trig pillar was built by the Ordnance Survey in 1936. These pillars aided in the triangulation of Britain, which was vitally important to the creation of accurate maps of the country.  Around 6500 of these Trig Pillars were constructed, and from 1936 to 1962, OS surveyors gathered measurements to create a highly accurate map of Britain. Approximately 6000 of these still remain – two of which are in the Clyde and Avon Valley area at Black Hill and Milton Head.

The exhibition runs from Monday 12 – Friday 30 September at Lanark Library. It will be open Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 9:15am – 5pm, Tuesday 9:15 – 8pm, Friday 10am – 5pm and Saturday 9:15 – 5pm. The exhibition will be closed on Sundays.

To find out more about CAVLP Heritage projects and how you can get involved, visit www.clydeandavonvalley.org. You can contact the team at [email protected] or on 01555 663 430. Follow them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/CAVLPHeritage or on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/CAVLPHeritage to keep up to date with events and workshops.

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19/08/16 CAVLP # , , , ,

Lanark Library to host Mapping the Past Exhibition and Guide Launch

Lanark Library to host Mapping the Past Exhibition and Guide Launch

Members of the public are invited to attend the FREE Mapping the Past pop-up exhibition and guide launch will take place on Monday 12 September, at Lanark Library.

The exhibition and guide explores the unique cartographic heritage of the Clyde and Avon Valley and a 2000 year history of mapping in Scotland, including connections to the Father of Modern Mapping, Carluke born Major-General William Roy and local sites of interest, such as the area’s trig pillars.

The exhibition, first displayed in Carluke earlier in the year, also showcases artwork created by local community groups, schools and Guide and Scout groups as part of the Mapping the Past Project. The project was undertaken by CAVLP Heritage, managed by Northlight Heritage and supported by Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP) and Historic Environment Scotland.

“The creative maps are a wonderful addition to the more traditional elements of the exhibition,” explains Karen McCusker, CAVLP Heritage Project Officer. “We started the workshops by exploring the legacy of mapping survey techniques and the first Ordnance Survey maps that Major-General William Roy produced, before creating personalised and expressive maps based in the Clyde and Avon Valley.”

Visitors to the exhibition are encouraged to take home copies of the Mapping the Past Guide, which offers details about the mapping heritage of the Clyde and Avon Valley. The guide will be available as a digital trail from www.clydeandavonvalley.org/trails from September 12 onward.

“The guide includes three trails and is a great way for all to get out and explore the mapping heritage of the Clyde and Avon Valley,” says Gavin McGregor, Project Manager at Northlight Heritage. “It takes you on journeys between trig pillars, historic sites and even includes Alasdair Gray’s fantastic 1969 ‘Falls of Clyde’ mural at the Kirkfieldbank Tavern.”

The Mapping the Past exhibition and guide launch corresponds with the 80th birthday celebrations of the Trig Pillar this year. The first trig pillar was built by the Ordnance Survey in 1936. These pillars aided in the triangulation of Britain, which was vitally important to the creation of accurate maps of the country.  Around 6500 of these Trig Pillars were constructed, and from 1936 to 1962, OS surveyors gathered measurements to create a highly accurate map of Britain. Approximately 6000 of these still remain – two of which are in the Clyde and Avon Valley area at Black Hill and Milton Head.

The exhibition runs from Monday 12 – Friday 30 September at Lanark Library. It will be open Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 9:15am – 5pm, Tuesday 9:15 – 8pm, Friday 10am – 5pm and Saturday 9:15 – 5pm. The exhibition will be closed on Sundays.

The exhibition precedes the launch of the Local Landscape Heroes CAVLP Heritage project later in September. This volunteer led project will celebrate the artists, writers, designers, architects and ordinary people of the Clyde and Avon valley who shaped the landscape and cultural heritage that defines the area as we know it today.

To find out more about CAVLP Heritage projects and how you can get involved, visit www.clydeandavonvalley.org. You can contact the team at [email protected] or on 01555 663 430. Follow them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/CAVLPHeritage or on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/CAVLPHeritage to keep up to date with events and workshops.

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25/07/16 New Lanark Search Room # , , , ,

Search Room Spotlight: Glass bottle of IRN BRU

Search Room Spotlight: Glass bottle of IRN BRU

This item was found on site during the restoration of New Lanark that began in the late 1970s. In comparing the design of bottles over the years it appears as though the date of the bottle is sometime during the late 1940s. The shape of the bottle was designed in the form of “BA BRU” who was featured in the long running cartoon strip that advertised the product, which began in 1930 until the early 1970s. Ba-Bru was inspired by the character of “Sabu” in Rudyard Kipling’s book “Sab: The Elephant Boy”.

Ba-bru-design 1948ba-bru

During the 1830s, Robert Barr started a family business of cork cutting in Falkirk. In 1857, Robert’s son, Robert decided to start selling aerated waters (soft drinks) out of Glasgow. During the nineteenth century, Scotland had problems with poor sanitation due to the industrial revolution. As a result, soft drinks became popular as they were guaranteed to be a safe, quality drink for people.

Iron Brew was officially launched in 1901 and featured Adam Brown on the design label, who was a famous highland athlete from Shotts. The production of Iron Brew stopped during the second war as it was not a designated “standard drink” and as a result of shortages of raw materials, production temporarily shut down. With their re-launch in 1947, the brand also changed their name due to emerging food labeling regulations enforced by the Government and since the beverage was neither brewed nor made of Iron, they changed their name to IRN BRU.

DSC_0150

Today, Scotland remains one of the only countries where IRN BRU is more popular than Coca Cola.

RESOURCES

http://www.agbarr.co.uk/about-us/our-history/bottle-gallery/

http://www.agbarr.co.uk/about-us/our-history/

 

Holly – New Lanark Archive Intern

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06/07/16 Behind the scenes at New Lanark , New Lanark Search Room , New Lanark World Heritage Site # , , , , , ,

Search Room Spotlight: Keys from New Lanark

Search Room Spotlight: Keys from New Lanark

There are numerous keys in our collection that were found during the restoration of New Lanark that began in the late 1970s. The photo above depicts a selection of keys that originally belonged to former residents of the village.

At its peak in 1818, there were 2,500 employees at New Lanark. The majority of people who worked in the Mills, lived in the early tenement blocks built by New Lanark’s founder, David Dale, to accommodate his workers. These buildings, including Braxfield Row, Long Row, Double Row, Wee Row, Nursery Row, Caithness Row, Mantila Row & New Buildings provided housing for around 200 families. Each family had one room with a window – excellent conditions for the period!. A typical tenement room had two “set in” beds on the wall opposite the fireplace. These consisted of a sturdy wooden framework built into the wall and a mattress which was a bag made of ticking and stuffed with chaff or straw. To accommodate larger families, a “hurlie bed” was used which was a simple cot-like bed on wheels that was stored under the “set in” bed. Each of the beds were shared by three or more family members as most tenements housed entire families that ranged from 8 to 10 members.

Traditional Housing at New Lanark

Traditional Housing at New Lanark

As the population of New Lanark declined over time, so the layout of the houses changed. Families would take over two rooms, sometimes even three, doors would be blocked up, new ones opened and most importantly, the house numbers would change with these alterations. Hence trying to match a key to a house is not as easy a task as it may seem!

Following a 40+ year restoration programme, all but one of the tenement blocks have now been restored (an the restoration of the last is underway).Today, there are 45 tenancies and 20 owner-occupied houses at New Lanark with a population of roughly 150-200 people who live here permanently. Mantila Row was unfortunately demolished during the restoration period as the building was unsafe but the exteriors of the other buildings remain pretty much unchanged. The keys however have got much smaller!

 

RESEARCH RESOURCES:

The Story of New Lanark, World Heritage Site

Living in New Lanark, New Lanark Conversation Trust

Historic New Lanark, Ian Donnachie & George Hewitt

 

Holly – New Lanark Archive Intern

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New Lanark World Heritage Site Aerial View

New Lanark is a beautifully restored 18th century cotton mill village in Scotland, and is one of Scotland's six UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

On our blog you'll find a behind-the-scenes look at all the latest news, events, stories and general 'goings-on' from New Lanark World Heritage Site.

We are always looking for guest bloggers to become involved with the blog. If you are interested in writing for us, please get in touch.

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