New Lanark World Heritage Site Blog

Mill Café

01/06/16 New Lanark Ice Cream , New Lanark Mill Café , New Lanark Mill Shop , New Lanark Visitor Centre , New Lanark World Heritage Site , Roof Garden , Tours at New Lanark # , , , , , , ,

10 reasons to visit New Lanark this summer

10 reasons to visit New Lanark this summer

From Ice Cream to our Interactive Gallery, there are so many reasons New Lanark is the perfect location for a day out this summer!

 

1. New Lanark Ice Cream

Summer always calls for a delicious ice cream! As of May this year, the entire production process for New Lanark Ice Cream takes place in the village of New Lanark! All of the profits from New Lanark Ice Cream are returned to New Lanark Trust to reinvest in the upkeep & development of the village. So, every time you have a cone you’re contributing to keeping the village available for lots of visitors to enjoy in the future!

New Lanark Ice Cream awards

Scottish ice cream is pucka 👌🏻👌🏻 #jaffacake #jammydodger #icecream #newlanark #scotland

A photo posted by Rebecca Allpress (@rebeccaaa_oxo) on

 

2. Clearburn Picnic & Play Area

After being redeveloped in September 2014, Clearburn Play & Picnic Area is a real hotspot for families at New Lanark in the summer. We even won the Hudsons Heritage ‘Best Heritage Picnic Spot UK’ in March 2016! With lots of fun play areas and picnic tables it’s the perfect setting for a picnic in the sun. Don’t miss the magical storytelling dome & willow tunnel! Entry to Clearburn is free.

People enjoying Clearburn

 

3. Woodland walk to Falls of Clyde

The village of New Lanark is located on the doorstep of the gateway to the Falls of Clyde wildlife reserve which is managed by the Scottish Wildlife Trust. Take a woodland walk in the reserve to spot lots of native animals like badgers and otters, and wonder at the beauty of three magnificent waterfalls! Entry to the Falls of Clyde Wildlife Reserve is free. 

 

4. Lots of picnic areas

We’ve already mentioned Clearburn as a fantastic picnic area, but we have lots of areas at New Lanark to make the most of the nice weather! Enjoy picnics at the Waterwheel, in Robert Owen’s Garden, in the walkway down into the village and even on our Roof Garden! (see point 5)

 

5. Roof Garden

At New Lanark we have the largest Roof Garden of its kind in Scotland – at an incredible 9,000 square feet! The garden is located on the flat roof of one of our Mill buildings, and has spectacular views across the village and to the first of the Falls – Dundaff Linn. Entry to the Roof Garden is included in the price of our Visitor Centre tickets, and you can also buy a ticket just for Mill 3 which includes the Annie McLeod Experience Ride, textile floor and Roof Garden.

 

6. Interactive Gallery

We all know that sometimes summer in Scotland doesn’t mean sun! For the days when it’s a ‘bit dreich’ we have the fantastic Interactive Gallery Soft Play Area. Located in Robert Owen’s School for Children this is a treat for the senses with bright colours, sounds, shapes and textures for children to enjoy. Entry is £1.50 per child with a Visitor Centre ticket, or £3 per child without (for up to 2 hours play). Under 1’s and adults go free!

Interactive Gallery

 

7. Daily Guided Tours

For the history buffs, or just those who’d like to know more about the fascinating history of New Lanark village we will be running a Daily Guided Tour throughout the South Lanarkshire summer holidays (25th June – 14th August). What was a piecer? How were Robert Owen and David Dale related? Why did the workers wear no shoes? Join us to find out! Guided Tours are an additional £2 on top of your Visitor Centre ticket and can be booked at the New Lanark Visitor Centre Reception. Places are limited per tour. Tours leave from 2pm at Visitor Centre reception. (no tours on 17th or 28th July) 

 

8. Craft Workshops for Kids

Monster puppets, wind chimes, dinosaurs and more! These are all of the fantastic crafts children can make at our Craft Workshops running throughout the Scottish summer holidays. Workshops must be booked in advance by calling 01555 661345 (Lines open 9am-5pm, Mon-Fri). Workshops are £3.50 per child or £2.00 with a Visitor Centre ticket. Running from 1-3pm in the School for Children.

Week 1 – 28, 29, 30 June – Hot Air Balloons

Week 2 – 5,6,7 July – Make your own underwater world

Week 3 – 12, 13, 14 July – Make your own Jungle/Jurassic world

Week 4 – 19, 21 July – Glass Jar Painting

No crafts on the week of Antiques Roadshow

Week 5 – 2,3,4 August – Monster puppets

Week 6 – 9,10,11 August – Wind chime making

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9. Mill Shops 

The Mill Shop offers a delightful range of gifts, homeware, Scottish produce and New Lanark Wool which is spun on-site using our historic textile machinery. From the end of July we’ll be stocking British clothing & accessories brand Joules in the Mill Shop. In the village we also have a Village Store which stocks lots of traditional ‘sweeties’, retro toys and fun souvenirs! The Mill Shop is open Monday – Saturday 9am – 5pm, and Sunday 10am – 5pm.

Organic Tartan range

The world’s first Organic Tartan collection – sold exclusively in the Mill Shop

10. Mill Café 

If you’ve worked up an appetite and it’s not quite picnic weather outside, then just head for the Mill Café at New Lanark! Located in an old mill floor, the Mill Café serves up a range of delicious home baking, hot lunches, tea, coffee and New Lanark Ice Cream all day. (Monday – Saturdya 9am – 5pm, Sunday 10am – 5pm)

New Lanark Mill Café

 

If all of those reasons aren’t enough, on-site we also have the New Lanark Mill Hotel, Mill One Bar & Mill One Restaurant and Wee Row Hostel. New Lanark is located less than a 5 minute’s drive from the historic Royal Burgh of Lanark. In Lanark you can visit the High Street shops, Castlebank Park, Lanark Loch and Racecourse!

Melissa – New Lanark Marketing and PR Officer

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23/04/15 A Visitor's View # , , , , , , ,

New Lanark: A Visitor’s View – Anabel Marsh

New Lanark: A Visitor’s View – Anabel Marsh

New Lanark is one of our favourite days out, especially when we have guests in tow. We’ve been visiting since the early days, when I remember being shown round one of the newly renovated houses by its resident. However, our most recent visit in March was not to view the mills – we wanted to see the exhibition in the Institute, which at that time was a tapestry telling the story of the Battle of Prestonpans. You don’t need a ticket to visit the exhibitions, so check out the current programme to see what’s on. The Institute is worth visiting in itself and we admired the banners on its walls.

New Lanark Bell Tower

Banners in the Institute for Formation of Character

There was time for a warming bowl of soup in the Mill Café before a walk up to the Falls of Clyde. We’ve done this before too, but I don’t think I’ve ever seen so much water in the Falls – the immense power which was available to the mills is obvious. We followed the Clyde Walkway past Corra Linn as far as the even more spectacular Bonnington Linn. We then looped back on the woodland trail, after which we were pleased to find the Mill Café was still open and ready to warm us up again with a nice cup of tea!

Bonnington Linn at New Lanark

Following a last stroll round the village, we started the climb back up to the carpark via the Old Cemetery, a poignant place which we hadn’t previously visited. As we went, we talked about our plans for next time when we might extend the loop of our walk right down to Lanark, and maybe even stay overnight in the New Lanark Mill Hotel. Can’t wait!

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Anabel Marsh – New Lanark Guest Blogger

Anabel’s Blog | Twitter

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16/03/15 A Visitor's View , New Lanark Visitor Centre # , , , , , , ,

New Lanark: A Visitor’s View – Donna Mairi MacIver

New Lanark: A Visitor’s View – Donna Mairi MacIver

We were delighted to welcome blogger Donna from www.ordinarywanders.com to write a guest blog for us on her trip to New Lanark. Have a read to find out what she enjoyed most about her visit…

 

What does the world famous Smithsonian Museum have in common with a small mill town in the south of Scotland? The answer lies in the heart of the New Lanark UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Our journey back to the 19th century began with our descent into the village from the car park. The rows of perfectly symmetrical buildings stand seemingly untouched. The River Clyde continues to flow through the site and churns as it ever did, though no longer in demand as the lifeblood of these once great mills. So much has changed at New Lanark due to the renovations which brought the original buildings back to life, but there is a sense that the true heart of this old mill town has endured.

Rooftops of New Lanark

I didn’t know much about Robert Owen, one time owner of the New Lanark mills, until I visited this famous historical landmark on that cold, grey day in February. Just walking around this site allows visitors to gain an understanding of what Owen wanted to achieve whilst in charge of the mills. His words are quoted throughout the town and provide a great insight into his forward-thinking views, which were sometimes deemed to be quite controversial.

Robert Owen's quotes at New Lanark

This is such an inspirational place to visit – here are just some of my personal highlights from the New Lanark Visitor Centre:

  • The Annie MacLeod Experience

This is a great little ride that allows visitors to gain an insight into life in New Lanark. Annie MacLeod, the ghost of a girl who worked in the mills in 1820, hosts the ride. She introduced us to some of Owens’ modern ideas, such as a workers sick fund and shorter working days. The rides’ effects and illusions were a real treat and I think it’s the perfect way to engage children with the reality of life in the 1800’s.

  • Robert Owen’s School.

Owen believed in community and education. Most notably, whilst other young people around the country were put to work almost as soon as they could walk, those of New Lanark were being encouraged to stay in school.  In this model classroom there are lots of things that you would expect to see; benches for the children to sit on, slates to write on, a lectern. There is also a replica cage that was once used to house a real crocodile. Owen was no ordinary man and the education he insisted on for the mill children was certainly not ordinary. He really was a person before his time and this classroom is indicative of that.

Robert Owen's School for Children

  • The Mill Café & Shop

The Mill Café has a great selection of refreshments and our generous soup and sandwich lunch kept us full until teatime (that’s dinner time to any non-Scottish readers!) The star of the show, though, was the coffee. The perfect, frothy latte I received really set me up for heading back out into the damp Scottish afternoon. We could have sat in this busy little café for the rest of our visit, if only the sites we had passed on the way in hadn’t called out to be explored.

Though the mills no longer work to full capacity, traditional methods are still used to produce smaller amounts of New Lanark wool. This can be bought in the on-site Mill Shop alongside lots of other locally sourced gifts and trinkets. It’s a real treasure trove there and well worth taking the time to look around.

Coffee in the Mill Café

  • Robert Owen’s House

This was the last stop on our tour and it felt like the satisfactory end to an epic journey. Inside there are replicas of the rooms that the Owen family stayed in. There is also a small exhibition that informs visitors about what became of the Owen family after they left New Lanark. The world famous Smithsonian museum? It was Robert Owen’s son who proposed its creation via the United States Congress. The Owen family all continued to do great things once they left Scotland, including; campaigning for gender rights, championing the resettlement of freed slaves in North America and establishing the first kindergarten in the US.

Other historical buildings include a replica of the mill workers accommodation and of the Village Store that once served the whole town, where you can still buy a treat or two. If you’d like more time to wander around the site you can choose to stay for a few nights in one of the renovated mills, which has been turned into the New Lanark Mill Hotel, or the Wee Row Hostel. And if you really enjoy your visit, you can even choose to stay on a more permanent basis in one of the local residential houses – though these are so popular they are swept off the market almost as soon as they appear.

Whatever the reason for your visit, I can guarantee you will leave inspired by the story of Robert Owen, his perseverance and his ambitions to make the world around him a better place. I know that I did.

Guest blogger – Donna Mairi MacIver

www.ordinarywanders.com

 

If you would be interested in writing a Visitor’s View Blog on your trip to New Lanark, please email [email protected] 

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New Lanark World Heritage Site Aerial View

New Lanark is a beautifully restored 18th century cotton mill village in Scotland, and is one of Scotland's six UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

On our blog you'll find a behind-the-scenes look at all the latest news, events, stories and general 'goings-on' from New Lanark World Heritage Site.

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