New Lanark World Heritage Site Blog

Nature

03/11/16 Roof Garden # , , ,

New Lanark Garden Diary – November 2016

New Lanark Garden Diary – November 2016

On 2 November after a frosty start to the day, the stonework of the houses at New Lanark’s Long Row was glowing in the early afternoon sunshine.  Above the Row, the trees are holding on to their leaves in all their glorious autumn colours while crows  wheel  in the clear air overhead.   On the right of the photo is one of the lime trees originally planted by Robert Owen about 1800 when he laid out the paths above the village so that his millworkers could take exercise and enjoy some fresh air after a hard day in the cotton mills.  If you come and visit, you can still enjoy that today!

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Visit New Lanark during one of our Christmas Events weekends and you can also enjoy a visit to Santa’s Grotto, Spirit of Christmas Ride and even a festive pantomime! Click here to find out more and book your tickets. 

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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07/10/16 Uncategorized # , , , , , , ,

New Lanark Garden Diary – October 2016

New Lanark Garden Diary – October 2016

Instead of the Roof Garden, this month’s diary is from another of New Lanark’s garden spaces, the War Memorial Garden, situated at the foot of the hill just at the entrance to the village.  The planting here includes several buddleia shrubs of the variety called ‘Peace’ with lovely arching spikes of white flowers.  The warm sunshine at the start of October attracted a large number of late summer butterflies seeking out nectar in the buddleia flowers.   The photograph shows several Small Tortoiseshells eagerly feeding before they go into hibernation for the winter.  As their numbers have been declining generally, this was an extra welcome and encouraging sight!

The New Lanark War Memorial is dedicated to soldiers from New Lanark who fought in the first World War. You can find out more about their stories in our semi-permanent exhibition ‘New Lanark and the First World War’.

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Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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22/09/16 CAVLP # , , ,

Sue Palmer puts Natural Play on top of the agenda in Lanarkshire

Sue Palmer puts Natural Play on top of the agenda in Lanarkshire

Lanarkshire’s first ever Natural Play conference is taking place in Hamilton this November.  The event has seen unprecedented demand for places since bookings opened last week, reflecting the huge appetite locally for natural play initiatives.

Sue Palmer, author of Toxic Childhood (Orion 2006), will act as keynote speaker for the FREE conference taking place at Hamilton Park Racecourse, which is open to anyone interested in why, where and how children can play outdoors.

Organised in collaboration with South Lanarkshire Countryside Rangers and supported by the William Grant Foundation and Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP), attendees will be able to find out what activities have been developed locally, as well as join skill-focussed talks and workshops which can be  booked on the day. Workshops will cover a range of topics including loose-parts play, safe campfires, woodland art and much more.

Karen Dobbins, Development Officer for CAVLP Natural Play focussed projects said: “Whether you are a parent, work with children in schools or nurseries, are a child-minder or a play-worker, the conference will offer a valuable opportunity to network and share ideas.”

She continues: “This conference is just a part of the Natural Play initiatives that CAVLP has been involved in establishing locally. Triple award-winning Natural Play and Picnic Area was created at New Lanark in 2014, we’ve had two jam-packed summers of play activities with newly established OutLET: Play Resource and 16 people have received training in Forest Schools.”

As part of the package, schools in and around the Clyde and Avon Valley can also access teacher training to support outdoor learning on local sites. In partnership with Grounds for Learning, CAVLP are offering FREE places on Teaching in Nature, an accredited course to support teachers in their professional development. The course begins on 24 October 2016 at RSPB Scotland Baron’s Haugh, Motherwell and consists of three practical training days spread out over a year. Local schools can book the last remaining spaces by emailing [email protected] or calling 01555 663 430.

Lanarkshire based Growing Up Wild Natural Play initiative is just one in a number of national and international initiatives, which recognise and attempt to redress the disconnect between children and nature in contemporary society. A number of reports highlight this growing disaffection, including Natural Childhood, by Stephen Moss (National Trust, 2012), which reveals that fewer than 1 in 10 children regularly play in wild places.

Acting as keynote speaker for the conference, former head teacher and campaigner for literacy, Sue Palmer, is an advocate for the issues surrounding the effects of contemporary childhood on development and learning. Her books, Toxic Childhood, Detoxing Childhood (2007) and 21st Century Boys (2009), led to her involvement in many campaigns related to modern childhood and she is currently a Board Member of Play Scotland.

“We are honoured to have Sue Palmer as keynote speaker for the conference,” says Susan McNeish, South Lanarkshire Countryside Rangers.

She continues, “We’ve found that there’s been a growing appetite for Natural Play initiatives locally and it’s great to have someone like Sue along who helps connect these local activities to the wider, national conversation. We’d urge any interested parties in coming along to sign up.”

Book your FREE ticket or find out more at www.cavlp.eventbrite.co.uk, or by contacting the CAVLP Team on 01555 663 430, or emailing [email protected].

Watch the promotional video by searching for ‘Growing Up Wild! Lanarkshire’s First Natural Play Conference’ on www.youtube.com.

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19/08/16 CAVLP # , , ,

FREE Woodland family fun for award-winning play area

FREE Woodland family fun for award-winning play area

Families are being invited to join in with FREE celebrations for award-winning Clearburn Natural Play Area’s Second Birthday Bash at New Lanark World Heritage Site, on Saturday 10 September, 1 – 3pm.

The FREE family drop-in sessions will include a variety of woodland themed fun and games, including ‘Fab Foraging’ woodland scavenger hunt with Scottish Wildlife Trust Falls of Clyde, Woodland-Walk Storytelling with Mr Fox and Bunny Foo Foo from Storyteller Allison Galbraith and woodland crafts from local artist Shirley Marzella.

No birthday celebration would be complete without balloons and cake – fairy cakes will be available for the first families who turn up on the day.

Clearburn Natural Play Area, comprised of adventure play areas, a giant willow storytelling dome and stage, a burn, a secret hideaway tree house, campfire and bug hotels amongst other features, was created in the heart of New Lanark World Heritage Site in September 2014 as a Big Lottery and Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP) funded project.

“In two years, Clearburn has become an important part of the local community,” says Jane Masters, Heritage Manager at New Lanark Trust. She continues: “It is used extensively by local schools, nurseries and families, as well as visitors to New Lanark. People can always be found playing in Clearburn – it’s a testament to the fantastic design of the space which incorporates natural areas as well as built structures.”

The design of the play space was led by children from New Lanark Primary School, Robert Owen Memorial Primary School and Lanark Primary School, with involvement from 60 members of the local community, from the initial consultations right through to implementation. The names of school children involved in the projects were carved into a bench beside the willow tunnel so that their contributions will be remembered for years to come.

Since opening, the play area has scooped three prestigious awards; ‘Best Picnic Area within a UK Heritage Location’ at the Hudson’s Heritage Awards (2016), ‘Commendation for a Community Play Space within a National Tourist Attraction’ Nancy Ovens Play Award (2015) and ‘High Commendation’ in the Scottish Civic Trust ‘My Place’ Awards (2015).

Clearburn Natural Play Area is part of a wider initiative in the Clyde and Avon Valley focussing on wild play and connecting families with nature, such as the Growing Up Wild play sessions at RSPB Baron’s Haugh, Mauldslie Woodlands and Lesmahagow during the summer holidays.

Karen Dobbins, CAVLP Development Officer, said: “We are delighted to be involved in the celebrations with New Lanark Trust. A key focus for a number of CAVLP projects is to create opportunities for natural play and Clearburn is a fantastic asset to the area.”

She continues: “Surrounded by woodland and with the Clear burn itself flowing through the play area, it allows safe access for children to ‘play wild’ and explore the natural environment. It really is something to celebrate.”

The Clearburn second birthday bash is a FREE, family drop-in event on Saturday 10 September, 1 – 3pm.

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16/08/16 SWT Falls of Clyde Visitor Centre and Wildlife Reserve # , , , ,

Evening walk to Corra Linn

Evening walk to Corra Linn

We’re enjoying a spell of beautiful weather in Scotland at the moment, so we decided to make the most of it by going on an evening walk to see the Falls of Clyde last night.

These magnificent waterfalls on the River Clyde have been impressing visitors for centuries – from Wordsworth to Coleridge, and J. M. W. Turner to Sir Walter Scott. The four linn (Scots: waterfalls) compromise of the upper falls of Bonnington Linn, Corra Linn, Dundaff Linn, and the lower falls of Stonebyres Linn. Corra Linn is the highest, with a fall of 84 feet. Bonnington Linn (fall of 30 feet), Corra Linn and Dundaff Linn (fall of 10 feet) are above New Lanark and located within the Falls of Clyde Reserve managed by the Scottish Wildlife Trust, a national nature conservation charity. Stonebyres Linn is located several miles downstream from the reserve and New Lanark.

Visitors can enjoy walks within the native woodlands, spotting wildlife and wondering at the flora & fauna all around them. Look our for kingfishers, otters, deer and badgers!

Dundaff Linn can be seen from the far end of New Lanark village. From there it is around a 20-30 minute walk along the river boardwalk until you arrive at Corra Linn. It is then another 20-30 minutes before you arrive at Bonnington Linn. (in total this route is 3 miles)

Here are a selection of our photos from last night’s walk! Plan your own visit at www.newlanark.org where there’s also a handy map!

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Find out more about visiting New Lanark and the Falls of Clyde.

Melissa – Marketing and PR Officer

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03/08/16 Roof Garden # , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: August 2016

Roof Garden Diary: August 2016

The swallow chicks in the nest under the Roof Garden viewing platform fledged successfully in the last week of July.   These baby swallows represent the sixth generation of their kind to be born and raised in New Lanark Roof Garden.  The Scottish Wildlife Trust identified them as swallows (as opposed to martins or swifts) from the reddish-russet colouring on their throats.  An amazing characteristic of these beautiful birds is their ability to feed while on the wing.  As they swoop through the air, they hoover up hundreds of midges so they are definitely our friends!  Soon even the young ones will be migrating many miles south to Africa for the winter, and with luck will return next spring as soon as the weather begins to warm up again.

Find out more about visiting the New Lanark Roof Garden. 

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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07/06/16 Roof Garden # , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary – June 2016

Roof Garden Diary – June 2016

Now, after a long cold  Spring, we have a heatwave!  The stars of New Lanark Roof Garden this month are surely the geraniums.  These sturdy plants can cope with most conditions and they bring a mass of gentle pink to the summer garden.  And there is a lot more to look forward to!  The shrubs and other plants will soon be in bloom and we hope butterflies will visit, perhaps even the Painted Lady species from Africa that has already been spotted in the south of England.

“They will be surrounded by gardens, have abundance of space in all directions to keep the air healthy and pleasant: they will have walks and plantations before them, and well cultivated grounds, kept in good order, as far as the eye can reach”.
(Robert Owen, 1817)

Click here to find out more about visiting the New Lanark Roof Garden

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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10/05/16 Roof Garden # , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: May 2016

Roof Garden Diary: May 2016

New Lanark Roof Garden Diary – May 2016

What could be better after the cold spring weather than to see these bright daffodils in New Lanark Roof Garden?  They have faced rain, strong winds and even snow, which bent their heads low but they have supple stems enabling them to bounce back when conditions improve.  The tree heather is now covered in blossom in the shape of tiny white bells and the woolly willow is beginning to show its fluffy yellow catkins.  Rising temperatures have brought the swallows back – watch them diving low through the fountain!

“They will be surrounded by gardens, have abundance of space in all directions to keep the air healthy and pleasant: they will have walks and plantations before them, and well cultivated grounds, kept in good order, as far as the eye can reach”.
(Robert Owen, 1817)

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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08/03/16 Roof Garden # , , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: March 2016

Roof Garden Diary: March 2016

At first sight not much seems to be happening in New Lanark Roof Garden this month. Look closer, however,  and you will see the first tentative flowers of Spring appearing in spite of the wild and changeable weather. A few snowdrops are quivering under the hornbeam hedging, and some early daffodils have big buds full of the promise of the yellow trumpets to come.  The tree heather shrub creates  a vigorous splash of green  covered in tiny pink bell-like flowers, and there are buds waiting to burst on the Woolly Willow.

Click here to find out more about visiting the New Lanark Roof Garden

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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05/02/16 Roof Garden # , , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: February 2016

Roof Garden Diary: February 2016

Dark storm clouds have been hanging over New Lanark Roof Garden for the past few weeks.  However, a welcome blink of winter sunshine at the start of February showed off the evergreens  and  lit up the houses at Braxfield Row in the distance.   Another highlight was a visit from a blackbird that sat for a while on the perimeter wall before hopping down to forage in one of the flowerbeds.

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Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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New Lanark World Heritage Site Aerial View

New Lanark is a beautifully restored 18th century cotton mill village in Scotland, and is one of Scotland's six UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

On our blog you'll find a behind-the-scenes look at all the latest news, events, stories and general 'goings-on' from New Lanark World Heritage Site.

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