New Lanark World Heritage Site Blog

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04/08/17 Roof Garden # , , , , , , ,

New Lanark Garden Diary: August 2017

New Lanark Garden Diary: August 2017

After the long dry Spring, the summer weather has been very wet.  The white Buddleia named ‘Peace’ is in full bloom in New Lanark’s War Memorial Garden, but its flowers have been somewhat spoiled by the rain, and the butterflies that usually arrive in abundance at this time of year have not so far appeared.

However, there is one butterfly that has been seen in the Clyde Valley Nature Reserve and in New Lanark Roof Garden where it was spotted drinking nectar from a purple-flowered buddleia.  (See photo.) This lovely butterfly is the Comma, so called because it has a tiny mark shaped like a comma (or small letter C) on its undersides.  The Comma’s story is one of remarkable  survival and  adaptation.

Comma caterpillars used to feed on hops and the butterfly was plentiful in Kent and the hop-growing areas of south east England.  However, when the industry went into decline, the butterfly’s population dropped severely.  In the past few years, however, it has staged an amazing recovery after the caterpillars adapted to eating the leaves of stinging nettles instead of hops.  As nettles grow nearly everywhere, the butterfly is now expanding its range right to the north of Scotland!  Global warming may also be having an effect on its expansion.   Visit New Lanark and see if you can spot this wonderful  butterfly!

Click here to find out more about visiting New Lanark and What’s On…

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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05/07/17 Roof Garden # , , , , , , , ,

New Lanark Garden Diary: Summer 2017

New Lanark Garden Diary: Summer 2017

June and July 2017

As the longest day passes, the summer begins.  In New Lanark Roof Garden, the combination of curry plant, and lavender with the dark pink of the tall penstemons, creates the appearance of a soft summer meadow in miniature. The yellow flag irises at the back of the garden didn’t do too well this year as the spring was warm and very dry, and they like moist soil.   At ground level, the area  between the Hotel and the first bridge over the lade is the lade overflow.  It is a full working part of New Lanark’s power generation system but has become an ecological niche in its own right.  Look out for the lovely flowing green stems and white flowers of the water crowfoot.  This amazing plant is adapted to live under the water with the flowers emerging on the surface.

Water crowfoot in the Mill Lade

Also look for the purple spires of watermint and frothy white heads of meadowsweet.  Later in July, little yellow monkey flowers will appear with them.  Robins, dippers and wagtails, also enjoy this environment with its flowing water and plenty of places at the side to perch.

Click here to find out more about visiting New Lanark and our current summer exhibition, Brick City!

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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07/06/16 Roof Garden # , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary – June 2016

Roof Garden Diary – June 2016

Now, after a long cold  Spring, we have a heatwave!  The stars of New Lanark Roof Garden this month are surely the geraniums.  These sturdy plants can cope with most conditions and they bring a mass of gentle pink to the summer garden.  And there is a lot more to look forward to!  The shrubs and other plants will soon be in bloom and we hope butterflies will visit, perhaps even the Painted Lady species from Africa that has already been spotted in the south of England.

“They will be surrounded by gardens, have abundance of space in all directions to keep the air healthy and pleasant: they will have walks and plantations before them, and well cultivated grounds, kept in good order, as far as the eye can reach”.
(Robert Owen, 1817)

Click here to find out more about visiting the New Lanark Roof Garden

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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10/05/16 Roof Garden # , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: May 2016

Roof Garden Diary: May 2016

New Lanark Roof Garden Diary – May 2016

What could be better after the cold spring weather than to see these bright daffodils in New Lanark Roof Garden?  They have faced rain, strong winds and even snow, which bent their heads low but they have supple stems enabling them to bounce back when conditions improve.  The tree heather is now covered in blossom in the shape of tiny white bells and the woolly willow is beginning to show its fluffy yellow catkins.  Rising temperatures have brought the swallows back – watch them diving low through the fountain!

“They will be surrounded by gardens, have abundance of space in all directions to keep the air healthy and pleasant: they will have walks and plantations before them, and well cultivated grounds, kept in good order, as far as the eye can reach”.
(Robert Owen, 1817)

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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05/02/16 Roof Garden # , , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: February 2016

Roof Garden Diary: February 2016

Dark storm clouds have been hanging over New Lanark Roof Garden for the past few weeks.  However, a welcome blink of winter sunshine at the start of February showed off the evergreens  and  lit up the houses at Braxfield Row in the distance.   Another highlight was a visit from a blackbird that sat for a while on the perimeter wall before hopping down to forage in one of the flowerbeds.

Blackbird

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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12/10/15 Roof Garden # , , , , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: October 2015

Roof Garden Diary: October 2015

Autumn is always a colourful time in New Lanark Roof Garden!  The highlight this month is surely the curved border with its riot of beautiful anemones glowing pink and purple in the slanting sunlight.  These plants are real toughies that can stand up well to Scotland’s climate.  The swallows have now disappeared to spend winter in Africa, but the autumn song of the robin trills out from the trees in the village below, and a Small Tortoiseshell butterfly made an appearance in the warm spell at the start of the month.

Find out more about visiting the New Lanark Roof Garden this Autumn. 

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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14/09/15 Roof Garden # , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: September 2015

Roof Garden Diary: September 2015

There has been some sunshine as New Lanark Roof Garden relaxes into its mellow late summer phase.  The buddleia is in flower at last, its rich purple spikes curving over to invite bees and butterflies to land on its densely packed florets and feed.  Here, the variety of buddleia is named ‘Harlequin’ and has attractive green leaves edged with white.  The lavender is also a favourite with the bees.   Colour contrasts are created by the anemones – the purple ones against the clear white of the Japanese anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’.   Make sure you visit New Lanark Roof Garden this autumn!

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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08/06/15 Roof Garden # , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: June 2015

Roof Garden Diary: June 2015

After a sunny April, May was cold, wet and windy.  However, the hornbeam hedging has unfurled its fresh green leaves, echoing the new foliage on the trees above the village.  Beneath the owl statue, the dark red leaves of heuchera ‘Palace Purple’ and the gray-blue foliage of santolina are starting to colour up. Highlights in May included a duck calmly paddling in the fountain while being dive-bombed by a swallow – but these acrobats of the air always manage to miss!   Also, a seven-spot ladybird was seen resting on some leaves – a welcome guest.  These ladybirds are beneficial in any garden, as they and their larvae feed on aphids and other plant pests so we should encourage them.  There’s lots to see in New Lanark Roof Garden, not just plants!

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

Visit the main New Lanark website to find out more about taking a trip to our award winning Visitor Centre this summer!

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New Lanark World Heritage Site Aerial View

New Lanark is a beautifully restored 18th century cotton mill village in Scotland, and is one of Scotland's six UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

On our blog you'll find a behind-the-scenes look at all the latest news, events, stories and general 'goings-on' from New Lanark World Heritage Site.

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