New Lanark World Heritage Site Blog

roof garden diary

06/04/16 Roof Garden # , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: April 2016

Roof Garden Diary: April 2016

The star of these damp April days in New Lanark Roof Garden is the tree heather (Erica arborea var.  alpina).  Unlike low-growing heathers, this shrub can grow up to two metres.  It has beautiful upswept evergreen branches covered in tiny flowers that show pink at first before opening into clusters of exquisite miniature white bells.  On the other side of the garden, a newly planted Buddleia shrub has taken root in spite of suffering a blast of hard frost early on.  During blinks of sunshine, a few blue anemones open their lovely star-shaped flowers.

Find out more about visiting the New Lanark Roof Garden. 

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

“They will be surrounded by gardens, have abundance of space in all directions to keep the air healthy and pleasant: they will have walks and plantations before them, and well cultivated grounds, kept in good order, as far as the eye can reach”.
(Robert Owen, 1817)
 

Tree heather flowers 2 (2)

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08/03/16 Roof Garden # , , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: March 2016

Roof Garden Diary: March 2016

At first sight not much seems to be happening in New Lanark Roof Garden this month. Look closer, however,  and you will see the first tentative flowers of Spring appearing in spite of the wild and changeable weather. A few snowdrops are quivering under the hornbeam hedging, and some early daffodils have big buds full of the promise of the yellow trumpets to come.  The tree heather shrub creates  a vigorous splash of green  covered in tiny pink bell-like flowers, and there are buds waiting to burst on the Woolly Willow.

Click here to find out more about visiting the New Lanark Roof Garden

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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12/10/15 Roof Garden # , , , , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: October 2015

Roof Garden Diary: October 2015

Autumn is always a colourful time in New Lanark Roof Garden!  The highlight this month is surely the curved border with its riot of beautiful anemones glowing pink and purple in the slanting sunlight.  These plants are real toughies that can stand up well to Scotland’s climate.  The swallows have now disappeared to spend winter in Africa, but the autumn song of the robin trills out from the trees in the village below, and a Small Tortoiseshell butterfly made an appearance in the warm spell at the start of the month.

Find out more about visiting the New Lanark Roof Garden this Autumn. 

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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10/08/15 Roof Garden # , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: August 2015

Roof Garden Diary: August 2015

A very wet July has meant that the ‘wrong’ plants and all the  weeds  are  growing  luxuriantly in New Lanark Roof Garden!   Many plants are well behind their usual flowering season.

The shrub, Philadelphus ‘Belle Etoile’, is now covered in scented white flowers that normally would appear in June or early July.

Meadowsweet is enjoying the damp conditions,  its frothy white plumes giving off a scent of summer .

In the past,  meadowsweet  was used as a strewing herb  spread  over  the  floor  as a natural air freshener  – perhaps even in the Millworkers’ Houses at New Lanark as it grows naturally along the banks of the Clyde.

Find out more about visiting New Lanark & the Roof Garden. 

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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14/07/15 Uncategorized # , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: July 2015

Roof Garden Diary: July 2015

The flat flowerheads  of the Dark-leaved Elder,  Sambucus nigra ‘Guincho Purple’, show  rich raspberry and cream  colours contrasting with its dark foliage.   Beneath it the milky bellfower, Campanula ‘Loddon Anna’, makes a carpet of green leaves punctuated by rounded heads of lovely pale lilac, bell-shaped flowers.  In the stone troughs, the low cushions of bright purple thyme are attracting lots of bees and hoverflies, and a Painted Lady butterfly has been sunning itself on the warm stonework.  Look out for these butterflies this  summer  –  they look pale brown in flight and have black and orange markings when settled.   Meanwhile the tall golden oat grasses  swish gently in the breeze overhead.   Enjoy the beauties of summer in New Lanark Roof Garden this month!

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

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08/06/15 Roof Garden # , , , , , ,

Roof Garden Diary: June 2015

Roof Garden Diary: June 2015

After a sunny April, May was cold, wet and windy.  However, the hornbeam hedging has unfurled its fresh green leaves, echoing the new foliage on the trees above the village.  Beneath the owl statue, the dark red leaves of heuchera ‘Palace Purple’ and the gray-blue foliage of santolina are starting to colour up. Highlights in May included a duck calmly paddling in the fountain while being dive-bombed by a swallow – but these acrobats of the air always manage to miss!   Also, a seven-spot ladybird was seen resting on some leaves – a welcome guest.  These ladybirds are beneficial in any garden, as they and their larvae feed on aphids and other plant pests so we should encourage them.  There’s lots to see in New Lanark Roof Garden, not just plants!

Liz – New Lanark Guest Blogger

Visit the main New Lanark website to find out more about taking a trip to our award winning Visitor Centre this summer!

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New Lanark World Heritage Site Aerial View

New Lanark is a beautifully restored 18th century cotton mill village in Scotland, and is one of Scotland's six UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

On our blog you'll find a behind-the-scenes look at all the latest news, events, stories and general 'goings-on' from New Lanark World Heritage Site.

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